Online Learning For Connected Ministry

Please contact Summer@CTU.edu if you have any questions.

Summer@CTU 2021 has adapted our course offerings fully online due to the COVID-19 pandemic. We invite you to explore our courses and workshops which feature CTU’s renowned faculty, visiting professors and facilitators. Now more than ever we need to come together for study and reflection to create meaningful faith-based and pastoral responses to changing global and ecclesial realities.  

 

If you have never experienced online learning before, your online course or workshop may include the following elements: prerecorded videos of lectures, required and recommended readings, links to external sources and discussion boards. Some courses and workshops will require live class time with faculty, (synchronous sessions) while others will not (asynchronous learning). CTU uses a private educational platform, D2L, for each course or workshop. Technology professionals will be available to help you with any questions.

Our summer offerings include the following series:

    • Women’s Experiences
    • Exploring Justice
    • Workshops for Thriving in Ministry

 

Register now!  Courses and workshops with low enrollment one week prior to the start of the course will be canceled. All courses will be offered for 1.5 credits and may be audited, with 1.5 continuing education units available. Workshops will be offered for zero credits, with 1.5 continuing education units available.

CTU students should register via our student portal.

All others can register here.

June 1-30

P2680 Philosophical Ethics

Herman Stark, PhD

A study of major philosophical theories of ethics and their application to concrete cases.

June 1-15

E4010S Women and Catholic Social Teaching

Leocadie Lushumbo, PhD

This course explores the inclusion/consideration of women in Catholic social teaching from Pope Leo XIII to Pope Francis. It will discuss several documents issued during the different papacies throughout history. The course will also bring up feminist critiques showing that despite its affirmation of equality of participation of both men and women in all spheres of life, Catholic social teaching after Vatican II, is still displayed with ambiguity in the matter of the equality of participation of men and women in Church and society, especially with regard to features like gender complementarity, mothering, and childbearing models.

June 1-30

B4050S Women in Early Christianity

Marian Diaz, DMin

This course will explore primary texts from the first three centuries of Christianity to understand the primary roles of women in the church. In addition, themes related to women’s daily experiences and female imagery and theology will be explored in light of early Church practice.

June 7-25

D4026S Theology and Practice of Non-violence

Jeffrey Meyers, PhD

Nonviolence is a method of struggle with a two-fold goal: to simultaneously resist injustice and oppression and construct a more peaceful and just world. Jesus practiced and proclaimed nonviolence in his opposition to the oppressive and exploitative social, economic, and political conditions of his day. In our own time, the church is called to preach and pursue the peace of God’s kingdom, including through supporting or initiating nonviolent campaigns against injustice and oppression. This course explores the Christian call to nonviolence through an examination of the teachings of Jesus and the work of a wide range of theologians and nonviolence theorists. It is designed to provide students with a foundation in both the theology and the practice of nonviolence.

June 7-25

G1060S An Introduction to Zoroastrianism: Faith, History, Modernity and Connections with Major Religions

Kayomarsh P. Mehta,  BE. MBA

This course is an introduction to one of the oldest religions with Belief in One Supreme Being. The universal teachings embedded in its Testament will enhance your own appreciation of the Immanence and Transcendence of God. Study of its concepts, practices, observances and celebrations will aid in deepening your faith in your own tradition.

July 1-31

MP4031S Exploring Sexuality and Family Latinamente: Christian Traditions and Contemporary Issues

Teresa Delgado, PhD

This course will explore the history of Christian teachings and traditions on the meaning of human sexuality with particular attention to the Latinx experience. Students will engage these teachings/traditions in relation to issues of gender identity, sexual identity, reproductive concerns, HIV/AIDS, to name a few.

All times are listed in CST*

 

Wednesdays, 7-8:30 pm in June

MP4021S Pastoral Work with Youth and Young Adults: Exploring and Applying Recent Findings

Marian Diaz, DMin

Recent research exploring the experiences of 13-25 year olds can help us reconsider and focus pastoral practice with this age group. Participants will read the findings of Springtide Research Institute whose broad ranging studies cover a diverse population including young people who are not religiously affiliated. In addition, works that focus on Catholic youth and young adults, including the work of Hoffsman Ospino on Hispanic youth and young adults, will be covered. Participants will support each other in developing new and innovative pastoral practice plans based on the research. Texts for this course are grant funded and will be provided to students at no cost.

Wednesdays, 9-10:30 am in June

MP4040S Theological Action Research: The Power of Collaborative Inquiry in Ecclesial Communities of Practice

Dan Rhodes, ThD and Marian Diaz, DMin

This course will introduce students to the process of theological action research for congregations. Integrating community organizing and qualitative research into a process of collaborative inquiry, theological action research offers a powerful mode of engaging local and formal knowledge to generate communities of practice capable of co-creating new ministries and reinvigorating ecclesial institutions. Students in this course will not just learn theological action research, but they will get to practice it as well.

June 7-11, 9 am - noon

B4048S Prophecy and Justice

Ethan Schwartz, PhD

The biblical prophets are famous for their stirring calls for justice, which have continued to resound in modern-day religious social action. In fact, this aspect of prophecy is so influential that for many contemporary Christians and Jews, the word “prophetic” itself means primarily to stand courageously against the powerful on behalf of the powerless. In this course, we will explore the biblical roots of the connection between prophecy and justice, situating it within its ancient contexts and tracing its subsequent reception in both theology and action. We will ask questions such as: How do the prophets configure justice in relation to worship, and why does this matter? How do prophetic calls for justice change over the course of biblical history? How have Catholics, Protestants, and Jews interpreted these passages differently? Can the historical-critical study of biblical prophecy inform the role it plays in contemporary justice work?

June 7-11, 1-4 pm

B4060S Church and Leadership in the Pastoral Letters

Ferdinand Okorie, CMF

This week-long course is based on a close reading and interpretation of the Pastoral Letters. Our reading and interpretation of the Pastoral Letters will pay close attention to the themes of church and leadership in the letters. Students will be familiar with the message of the letters in the context of the early church, and gain competency in proclaiming the letters in today’s church.

June 14-18, 9 am - noon

SMW4030S All that Is Seen and Unseen: Art and Architecture in the Catholic Church

Mickey McGrath, OSFS

The study of art and architecture throughout church history offers us an unique opportunity to come to a deeper understanding of the spirituality and theology of our ever changing times. This course will present the artists of each age as prophets and voices from the margins and look beneath the surface at details of the life within.

June 14-18, 9 am - noon

B4055S Leviticus and Numbers

Stacy Davis, PhD

This course is a study of the third and fourth books of the Torah or Pentateuch in the Hebrew Bible, also known as the law. Christian theology and scholarship often pay little attention to these books, either dismissing them as outdated historical relics that have no relationship to Christianity or using them as a foil against which the Gospels look modern and progressive. This course will serve as a corrective to common scholarly neglect among Christians by focusing on two of the most important books in Jewish tradition and placing them in conversation with various forms of biblical criticism and anthropological theory, in order to appreciate these books both as carefully constructed works of literature and as invaluable sources of information about ancient Israel and contemporary Judaism.

June 14-18, 1-4 pm

MPS4005S Caste, Race and the Catholic Church: Implications for spirituality and ministry

C. Vanessa White, DMin

Using the books Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents (Isabel Wilkerson) and Racial Justice and the Catholic Church (Bryan Massingale) as frameworks, this course will address the over 400 years of the system of caste and racism in the United States and specifically focusing on the Catholic Church. The hope is that this course will provide a place to have honest conversations and participants will gain insight for the anti-racist work that we are all called to be engaged.

June 14-18; 9 - noon

MP4001S Spirituality of Motherhood

Chrissy Zaker, DMin

Motherhood is both a deep well of spiritual insights and a locus in need of tender spiritual care. This course will look at the traces of spirituality found in the voices of mothers from diverse backgrounds. We will explore these voices to determine both the wealth they bring to the life of a community of faith as well as how to best support and nurture their spiritual needs through our ministry.

June 21-25, 9 am - noon

B4426S Paul: The Apostle's Theology for the Twenty-First Century

Donald Senior, CP

Fr. Don Senior

In critical times, the church has repeatedly turned to Paul to renew its vision of Christian life. That is true today when the church and the world face profound challenges. This course will study Paul’s theology from this vantage point: reflecting on his unflinching attention to the death and resurrection of Christ as the pattern for human destiny, on his view of the church as a harmony of gifts, on his spirit of radical equality and collaboration, and on his vision of a redeemed future for humanity and for creation.

June 21-25, 1-4 pm

W4405S Death and Afterlife - Liturgy and the Promise of the Resurrection

Rev. Richard Fragomeni

This course will present the varied ways in which we talk about the afterlife from narrative, liturgical and doctrinal perspectives. In addition, the course will explore the renewed Catholic doctrine on purgatory. Finally, students will also engage in funeral planning for themselves and others. This course is an elaboration on the series offered in November 2020 entitled, Pondering Death in the Month of Holy Souls.

June 21-25, 1 - 4 pm

DS5102S God and the Mystery of Suffering

Robin Ryan, CP

The stark reality of human suffering has challenged the minds of philosophers and religious thinkers through the ages. It also engages the minds and hearts of pastoral ministers. In this course, students explore the ways in which the mystery of human suffering has been addressed in the Bible, the theology of the early Church, medieval theology, and by modern thinkers such as Elie Wiesel, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Jürgen Moltmann, Edward Schillebeeckx, Gustavo Gutiérrez, and Elizabeth Johnson. Students are invited to enter into sustained reflection on the way in which they conceive of God’s relation to suffering people.

June 7-11 - 1-2:30 pm

K2040S Beyond God: Images of the Holy One for an Evolving Humanity

Elizabeth-Anne Stewart, DMin, PhD

In a world ravaged by pandemic, global warming, social upheaval and the failure of our guiding institutions, the old names and images for God no longer resonate. As Creation groans, a new humanity is emerging from the blood and the tears – one that is socially conscious, aware of our connectedness, and protective of the Earth and her creatures. This “new humanity” will not settle for conventional piety, authoritarian religion or limiting images of Divinity. As human consciousness evolves, so does our capacity to understand biblical revelation regarding the nature of the Holy One. When we disregard the layers of social constructs that have obscured the Divine Image, we will discover the God of the Mysterium, that God Beyond God, the God of the Mystics, who is present in spite of VUCA (Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity) and perhaps because of it. As we awaken to our human potential, actualizing the divinity within, so will we see as God sees, feel as God feels and be as God is. Our destiny is nothing less than to become that which we seek.

 

June 14-18; 10-11:30 am

K2035S Social Psychology, Race and Coaching

Angela Swain, PhD

Social Psychology is a scientific study of how people’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the actual, imagined, or implied presence of others as well as the scientific study of how people think about, influence, and relate to one another. This workshop will explore the relationship between how our view of the world influences our relationships, perceptions of others, and leadership style. We will explore the relevance of socio-psychological research to current discourse regarding race in America as we create mindful ways of interacting well in our relationships.

June 21-25; 10-11:30 am

K2030S Emotional Intelligence for Church Leadership

Angela Swain, PhD

Emotions are a critical source of information in our human experience. This workshop explores emotional intelligence as a significant aspect of our experience as church leaders. We will look at its core competencies and significance in ministerial contexts. This workshop offers a theoretical lense to emotional intelligence while providing case studies which address how emotional intelligence impacts various work outcomes, including stress, conflict management, communication, employee engagement, turnover, and retention.

In consultation with the National Leadership Roundtable on Church Management, Catholic Theological Union presents Critical Skills for Pastoral Leadership: Enhancing Management through Practical Wisdom.

 

The asynchronous workshop will be offered online from August 9-20
Ideal for new Pastors and their teams: including pastoral, school and finance councils, other committees and staff, as well as diocesan offices and agencies. Consider attending with your parish/school colleagues and co-workers to reflect on your experiences and enhance your skills together.

 

The following topics will be presented and discussed:

 

Administration and Administrative Service, Communications and Conflict Resolution, Human Resources Management, Fundraising and Development, Budgets and Financial Management, Intercultural Approaches to Faith and Ministry, Wellbeing in Ministry

Reframing Retirement for Mission assists the participants in making the transition from active ministry to retirement, with a special focus on recognizing and living the retirement years as a fruitful period of life with possibilities for personal growth as well as new opportunities for engaging in ministry. Retirement need not mean withdrawal from meaningful work on behalf of Christ’s mission and ministry, but it does require a realistic, necessary and creative adjustment in how to continue to respond faithfully to the call to bring Christ to others and to our world.

 

Reframing Retirement for Mission will be offered online from Monday, June 7th – Friday June 25th. This program will include morning presentations from 9 -11 am CST from our renowned speakers. The topics include the spirituality of aging, life transitions, theological updating and the arts. Most talks will be recorded and will be posted on our private program site for viewing as well. Please see the attached schedule for more details. Optional online discussions with others in this stage of life transition will also be offered. We encourage all participants to build in time for personal reflection, spiritual direction and focus on your own wellbeing during this virtual experience that seeks to support real spiritual and ministerial growth.

 

Registration Information: 

 

For more information or to register online, visit ctu.edu/summeratctu/reframing-retirement/. For questions or concerns please contact Jessica Curbis at admissions@ctu.edu or 773-371-5436.

Fees

  • Summer registration fee (non-refundable) $50
  • Audit fee per 1.5 credit-hour course – NEW REDUCED FEE $300
  • Workshop fee $250
  • Graduate academic fee per 1.5 credit-hours $1410
  • Reframing Retirement for Mission $750
  • Critical Skills for Pastoral Leadership $500

For questions regarding payment or to make a payment by credit card call the business office at 773.371.5405. Mail payments to: Attn: Business Office, 5401 South Cornell Avenue, Chicago, IL 60615

Alumni Discount

CTU Alumni receive a 25 percent discount on all Summer@CTU audit and workshop fees.

Register Early!

Note that courses are subject to change. Courses with low enrollment as of two weeks prior to the start of the course will be canceled and a full refund will be issued. CTU is accredited by the Association of Theological Schools.