Biblical Languages & Literature

B 3000 Introduction to Old Testament 
This course provides an introduction to the literature of the Old Testament and its historical, cultural, religious, geographical and social context. Various methodological tools for investigating the content and genre of the texts will be studied. Throughout the course, students will investigate the different theologies presented by the Old Testament writers. (3 credit hours)

B 3001 Introduction to New Testament
This course provides an introduction to the literature of the New Testament and its historical, cultural, religious, geographical and social context. Various methodological tools for investigating the content and genre of the texts will be studied. Throughout the course, students will investigate the different theologies presented by the New Testament writers in order to see how their theologies shape various images of Jesus of Nazareth. (3 credit hours)

B 3300 Biblical Hebrew
An intensive introduction to the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of biblical Hebrew prepares students to translate passages of the Old Testament.

B 4000 Pentateuch 
Pentateuchal traditions, including the primeval narratives, ancestral history, exodus, Sinai and wilderness traditions, are studied in the context of their literary origins and development and in the light of their importance for ancient Israelite religion and theology and contemporary theological significance.  Emphasis will be on the biblical material itself.

BC4001/BC5001:Reading the Bible en Espanglish: Latin@ Biblical Interpretation for Ministry

The relationship between the lived daily experiences of Latin@ communities in the USA and their engagement with the Bible/la Biblia serves as point of departure for any number of Latin@ biblical scholars. This course explores the hermeneutical methods, sources, themes, and insights of an ecumenical selection of Latin@ biblical scholars with particular attention to their significance for ministry.


B 4005 Book of Jeremiah 
This course offers a literary and theological interpretation of the book of Jeremiah.  The book is studied in its varied contexts, in the themes and motifs that hold it together, and in the issues and questions it raises for readers.

B 4009 The Biblical Landscape:  The Bible and Archaeology
This lecture series will introduce the discipline of biblical archaeology by examining the development of the discipline and its methodology, by looking at the results of  important excavations from Bronze Age to the Byzantine Period sites in the Holy Land, and reviewing its impact on biblical studies.

B 4011 The Catholic Epistles
Addressed to the church at large, the epistles of James, 1-2 Peter, 1-3 John, and Jude reflect the moral, theological, and eschatological concerns of late first century Christian communities. This course surveys the content and theological perspectives of these letters. Students will practice integrating critical exegetical study of the text with theology, spirituality, and pastoral practice for a multicultural church. Prerequisite: B4205: Introduction to the New Testament. 

 

B 4020 Job: Protest Literature
The Book of Job will be examined from both literary and theological lenses.  Its placement in the body of Wisdom Literature will be considered first.  Then the themes of creation, retribution, innocent suffering, theodicy, and divine incomprehensibility will be probed.  Finally, the contemporary implications of the book’s religious message will be discussed.

B 4021 Twelve Prophets
This course studies the Twelve Prophets (Hosea through Malachi) with respect to their original historical, social, and literary contexts, and to their theological interpretation in the Christian and early Jewish traditions. The course will also treat the nature and formation of prophetic literature, as well as the dynamic of prophecy and fulfillment. Emphasis will be placed on the role of critical study of the Twelve and of the history of interpretation as resources for contemporary theological reflection and pastoral practice.

B 4026 The Book of Genesis
The Book of Genesis is a primary source of the foundational traditions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The course will study this book by focusing on its theological perspectives against the background of its literary and cultural contexts and by considering various contemporary approaches to its interpretation.

B 4027 The Book of Isaiah
This course will examine selected texts from the Book of Isaiah. While attending to the life-situation of each text to be studied, the course will focus on the literary and theological integrity of the book as a whole and how individual texts fit into that integrity.

B 4039 Using the Bible in Ministry (3 credits)

This is a course in the practical use of the Bible in various ministry situations:  in parish adult faith formation, in lectionary based catechesis, in RCIA, in children’s liturgy of the Word, and in the context of spiritual direction and retreats.

B 4301 Old Testament Narrative Literature
This course investigates selected short stories and novellas of the Catholic OT canon, such as Ruth, Tobit, Esther, Daniel, Judith, and the story of Joseph and his brothers. These works are examined as narrative literature that invites an exploration of challenging theological and ethical questions that remain relevant for people of faith today.   

B 4306 (online) Encountering the Bible Lands. Part A. (1 ½ credits)

This on-line course introduces the student to the history, geography, and significant archaeology of the Old and New Testament. The student learns how acquaintance with nonliterary sources has important implications for our understanding of the biblical text. The course runs from February 21-April 11, 2018, and is required of participants in the BSTP Spring Study/Travel Program, but is open to all students and auditors.

 

B 4306i Travel Seminar: Encountering the Bible Lands. Part B.  (4 ½ credits)

This travel seminar provides the participant in the BSTP an opportunity to visit significant archaeology and historical sites in Israel/Palestine, Greece, and Turkey. On-site lectures integrate archaeology and history with the biblical text.

 

B 4307 Toward a Biblical Theology of Friendship (1 ½ credit hours)

This course makes two extraordinary claims: that our life’s ultimate goal is friendship with God and that the Scriptures provide the roadmap. Friendship with God is a gift of Holy Wisdom (Wis 7:27). God speaks to Moses face to face as one speaks to a friend (Exod 33:11). And most striking of all these biblical examples, Jesus calls his own disciples “friends” (John 15:15). This course engages a dynamic process that integrates personal experience with biblical study in order to trace the emerging theology of friendship in the Scriptures.

B 4310 Old Testament Prophets
This course explores prophets, prophecy, and prophetic literature in the Old Testament. The theology of selected texts from the Pentateuch, historical books, and prophetic books will be examined from the perspective of their original historical, social, and literary contexts and of their value for theological reflection and pastoral practice in contemporary contexts.

B 4311 Deuteronomistic History: The Former Prophets
This advanced-level course focuses on the Former Prophets of the Hebrew Bible (Joshua-Judges-Samuel-Kings). Critical study of selected texts from these books will lead to an appreciation of both their literary and theological dimensions with a view to seeing their relevance to the Christian faith.

B 4312 Second Temple Judaism and Early Rabbinic Judaism
The first part of the course focuses on an examination of the variety of expressions of Judaism in the Second Temple period. The second part focuses on the emergence of Rabbinic Judaism in the wake of the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 C.E.

B 4325 Humanism, Skepticism and Faith: The Wisdom Books of the Old Testament (3 credits)

A survey that will study selected texts from Old Testament wisdom literature to probe its belief in humankind’s ability to find many levels of meaning in life and to cope with and even master the problems of human existence.

B 4313 Old Testament Poetry: Wisdom books and Psalms
An investigation of selections from the psalms and the wisdom tradition of the Old Testament, this course concentrates on careful reading of the text, the various theological concerns found there, and the importance of this material for ministerial practice.

B 4314 The Psalms: A Literary and Theological Study
This course is divided into four units. In the first unit, we will explore the many literary techniques that the authors of the psalms used, including chiastic structures, intertextual allusions, and parallelisms. Students will conduct close readings of the psalms in order to determine their literary features. In the second unit, we will discuss the genres of the psalms, and focus in particular on communal psalms of thanksgiving and individual psalms of lament. The third unit will ask students to explore the varied historical contexts of some of the psalms. This course will close with a study of the reception of the psalms in modern times.

B 4318 Paul: His Life, Letters and Theology
This course explores the literary and theological aspects of the Pauline epistolary archive, attending to the historical, social, cultural and religious context from which early Christianity emerged. As author or inspiration for the genuine and disputed letters, Paul’s experience of hybridity will be explored and serve as a hermeneutical key for interpreting the letters in today’s intercultural church.

B 4319 The Book of Revelation
An exegetical-theological study of the book of Revelation (Apocalypse) set within the matrix of the Jewish apocalyptic world and genre to draw out its theological and pastoral significance then and now.

B 4321 Book of Exodus 
This course explores the book of Exodus from historical, literary, and theological perspectives, as well as selected aspects of its history of interpretation and reception in various contexts. Emphasis will be placed on the critical study of Exodus and its reception as resources for contemporary theological reflection and pastoral practice.

B 4326 Israel’s Choice: The Book of Deuteronomy (3 credits)

A study of selected texts from the Book of Deuteronomy to become familiar with the content and theology of this statement of traditional Israelite morality and the book’s motivational strategy.

B 4322 Deutero-canonical Books
This course examines the Deutero-canonical Books (with selections chosen among Tobit, Judith, Esther, Wisdom, Sirach, 1 and 2 Maccabees) to see how these inspired books have shaped Catholic theology in relation to their continuities and discontinuities with similar works in the Hebrew Bible.

B 4323 The Theological Vision of Paul the Apostle 
Paul remains a dominant voice in the New Testament.  His ardent love for the Crucified Christ, his deep and abiding roots in Judaism, his apostolic sufferings on behalf of the gospel, his dynamic sense of mission and his vision of an inclusive and compassionate church—all of these are fundamental motifs of this remarkable follower of Jesus and a foundation of the church’s life and mission today. This course will study the life of Paul within the context of Judaism and the Early Church and consider his major letters.  An introductory course on the New Testament is a recommended prerequisite.  Auditors are welcome.  

B 4400 Biblical Greek
This intensive introduction to the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of biblical Greek prepares the student to translate passages of the New Testament and early Christian literature.

B 4402 The Gospel According to Mark
A study of the Gospel of Mark with attention to its historical, literary, cultural, and theological world. The course helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, spirituality, and pastoral practice for a multicultural church.

B 4405 Gospel According to Matthew
A study of the Gospel of Matthew with attention to its historical, literary, cultural, and theological world. The course helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, spirituality, and pastoral practice for a multicultural church.

B 4406 The Gospel According to Luke
A study of the Gospel of Luke with attention to its historical, literary, cultural, and theological world. The course helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, spirituality, and pastoral practice for a multicultural church.

B 4407 Gospel According to John
A study of the Gospel of John with attention to its historical, literary, cultural, and theological world. The course helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, spirituality, and pastoral practice for a multicultural church.

B 4408 Acts of the Apostles
A study of the missionary expansion of early Christianity as depicted in Acts of the Apostles. The course helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, spirituality, and pastoral practice for a multicultural church.

B 4409 Revelation and Letters of John
Thematic and exegetical study of the book of Revelation (Apocalypse) and the letters of John from the perspectives of history, culture, understanding of church, apocalyptic and epistolary genres, and contemporary interpretation.

B 4410 Christian Origins and the Pauline Mission
The missionary activity of Paul and his apostolic team is explored through his letters, Greco-Roman and Jewish literature, and archaeology tracing the development of the Christian religion as it encountered new cultures and adapted to its social environment.

B 4411 The Corinthian Correspondence
A study of 1-2 Corinthians with attention to the historical, literary, cultural, and theological world of that time. An examination of the relevance of Paul’s pastoral approaches for a contemporary multicultural church.

B 4412 (online) Portraits of Jesus in the Synoptic Gospels

A historical, literary, and theological study of diverse themes and topics of each Synoptic Gospels (Mark, Matthew, and Luke) to draw out who the human Jesus really was behind all the different portraits. Attention is also given to pastoral application for contemporary readers.

B 4420 Galatians and Romans
A study of Paul’s life and world, with attention to the letters to the Galatians and Romans in their historical, literary, cultural, and theological context. The relevance of Paul’s theological and pastoral approaches to the contemporary multicultural church is addressed.

B 4421 Synoptic Gospels
This course is a study of the three Synoptic Gospels (Mark, Matthew and Luke) focusing on the narrative, historical background, and theology of each evangelist. An exploration of source, form and redaction criticisms will enable the student to better understand and interpret the similarities and differences among these three gospels. The course helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, spirituality, and pastoral practice for a multicultural church. 

B 4430 Luke-Acts
A study of the Gospel of Luke and Acts of the Apostles with attention to their historical, literary, cultural, and theological contexts. The course helps students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, spirituality, and pastoral practice for a multicultural church.

BW 4440 The Gospel of Luke Exegeted and Preached
A study of the Gospel of Luke with attention to its historical, literary, cultural, and theological world in conjunction with study of the principles and theology of liturgical preaching. The course aims to help students integrate critical exegetical study of the text with theology, spirituality, and pastoral practice for preaching from the biblical text in a multicultural church.

B 4501 Gospel Parables
Study of the dynamics of the parables in the Synoptic Gospels as stories that challenge the hearer to conversion. Attention is given to historical, literary, cultural, and theological perspectives and to insights for preaching and teaching parabolically.

BC 4502 Perspectives in African Biblical Interpretation
After an introduction into the African culture and context, the approaches, themes, and texts in current African biblical interpretation are studied. Participants are introduced to the question of text and context in interpretation.

BC4503 Biblical Foundations for the Church’s Universal and Inclusive Mission

As Pope Francis has reminded the church both by his words and his actions, we are to be “missionary disciples,” that is, a church not closed in on itself but reaching out to the world with the message of the Gospel, particularly to those who are most vulnerable.  This course will identify biblical motifs from both the Old and the New Testaments that frame the scope and content of the Christian mission in the world today.  The dialectic between identity and outreach, between the particular and the universal, and between community and mission mark the entire Scriptures and throw light on the challenges and opportunities facing the global Church.

B 4504 Jesus Through Jewish Eyes
This course examines the different ways that Jews have related to the figure of Jesus during his life (to the extent that can be determined) and throughout the history of Christianity. Also demonstrated is the manner in which, at any given time, these attitudes are related to the state of Jewish-Christian relations.

BS 4520 Biblical Foundations of Spirituality
The faith of ancient Israel and of the early Christian communities is explored in order to draw from them the grounding for a contemporary biblical spirituality. Attention is given to biblical images for God, the various modes of prayer and worship, and the ethical demands for justice and peace in the biblical world and in our own.


B 5002 The Scriptures in Jewish Interpretive Tradition 
How did Jews in the Second Temple, rabbinic, and medieval periods read the Hebrew Scriptures? How have Jews read the Hebrew Bible in modern times? This course will examine the interpretive traditions and developments among Jewish readers, using the book of Genesis as a lens with which to study the history of Jewish biblical exegesis. Interpretive texts will include passages from Midrash, Rashi (Rabbi Solomon Itzhaki), Nachmanides, and Maimonides.

BC 5002 Women in the Scriptures
An advanced seminar in feminist approaches to the scriptures, examining texts from the canonical as well as some non-canonical literature.

BD 5002 The Cross in Scripture and Theology
The cross is the central symbol of the Christian faith. Yet the meaning of the cross has been interpreted in many different ways through the centuries, from a source of scandal to the “tree of life.” In this course, students will explore interpretations of the death of Jesus on the cross, including those found in the Pauline letters, the Gospels and other New Testament texts, the works of classic Christian thinkers, and the thought of contemporary theologians writing from a variety of perspectives. The goal of the course is to deepen students’ insight into the meaning of the death of Jesus and the symbol of the cross in Christian life, spirituality and preaching.

B 5003 Postexilic Literature
An advanced seminar that explores the biblical literature that emerged in the decades after the end of Babylonian exile. Ezra, Nehemiah, Zechariah, Malachi, and other texts are examined as theological responses to the profound challenges faced by Israel in new historical and social circumstances.

 

BC 5003 Strangers, Migrants, and Refugees in the Bible

A literary, historical, and theological examination of various strangers, migrants and refugees in the OT and NT in order to help students to address effective pastoral responses to the issue of migration in our world today. Cross-cultural issues, implications and applications are addressed.

B 5005 Messianic Expectation in Early Judaism
This course is a seminar on messianism as it developed in ancient Israel and early Judaism in light of the Christian confession of Jesus as the Messiah.

 

BH 5010 Early Christian Literature Seminar
This seminar investigates sectarian literature, written within the first three hundred years of the common era, in order to study the development of emerging Christian society and culture. The course will explore the seeds of orthodoxy and heresy that characterize the post-apostolic age and that lead to the canonization of texts.

B 5011 Ancient Epistolography and Early Christian Letters
Twenty-one of the twenty-seven books of the New Testament are called “letters,” and epistles appear to have been the standard mode of communication between churches and church leaders. This course explores the methods of ancient letter-writing and delivery, and the social setting and rhetorical function of early Christian letters. Greek is preferred but not required. Open to non-MA students with permission of instructor.

BC 5012 Latina Perspectives on Biblical Interpretation
A seminar on the work of women theologians in the U.S.A. and in Latin America, with attention to Latina feminist/mujerista methods for interpreting scripture and insights for preaching and teaching from the scriptures in a multicultural church.

B 5012 Intermediate Biblical Exegesis 
This methods course allows students to develop skills necessary for careful and critical study of biblical texts. Participants engage in close reading of texts from both testaments, are introduced to and practice various historical and literary approaches to the study of the Bible, and deepen their research skills for biblical study. This course provides a foundation for further academic and pastoral engagement with the Bible. Required for MA in Bible majors, all others with permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: B4203 and B4205 

B 5020 Biblical Hermeneutics 
This methods course explores the rationale and practice of biblical interpretation and actualization, the movement from exegesis of a biblical text to thinking about its current relevance or implications in specific contemporary settings. Philosophical and theological foundations of principles of interpretation (hermeneutics) form the basis for an exploration of selected approaches or interpretive lenses brought to the Bible, which can include theological interpretation, feminist readings, postcolonial readings, and various contextual readings. Required for MA in Bible majors, all others with permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: B4203 and B4205 

B 5120 Seminar: Church in the New Testament
Explores the different perceptions and images of the church in the New Testament canon. Structures of communal organization, worship, and ministry, as well as the diversity in both theology and praxis are investigated.

B 5305 Passion Narratives
Study of the four Gospel Passion and Resurrection accounts, using a variety of approaches to biblical interpretation. Attention is given to how the various interpretations of the violent death of Jesus can help stop cycles of violence in contemporary contexts.

B 5400 Intertestamental Literature
A seminar focusing on non-canonical Jewish literature produced from 200 B.C. to A.D. 200. Emphasis on the impact of these writings on the theology of early Christianity and rabbinic Judaism.

B 5423 Jewish-Christian Relations
The course covers the history and current state of Christian/Jewish Relations and focuses on recent documents issued by both religious bodies.

B 5511 Fundamentalist Biblical Interpretation
A seminar focusing on the origins of fundamentalism and its approach to biblical interpretation with an attempt to formulate a pastoral response to the theological stance and proselytizing efforts of fundamentalists.

 

 

Doctrinal Studies

D 3000 Fundamental Theology and Methods

This course introduces students to the fundamental issues and tasks of systematic theology, laying the foundation for further study of various theological loci. Particular attention is given to theologies of revelation, divine self-communication, and faith considered in light of diverse human experience; the role of history and context in theology; tradition, authority, and magisterium; and contemporary currents and methods in theology.

D 4000 Survey of Systematic Theology

This course consists of an overview of topics and themes in systematic theology. Among the areas that will be treated are: revelation and faith, Trinitarian theology, Christology, creation, sin and grace, ecclesiology, Mary and the saints, sacramental theology, and eschatology. The course is designed to give students a broad exposure to the ways in which these central themes are treated in the Judeo-Christian tradition and in contemporary theology.

D 4003/D 5003 Mestizo Theologies Across the Latin@ Americas  

This course looks at the contributions of second- and third-generation liberation theologians and philosophers, both in Latin America and the United States, who expand upon early Latin American liberation theology in some important ways.  Rather than frame their work in terms of the classical categories of systematic theology, these figures think in terms of a more overarching, organic, and non-sectarian sense of spirituality that is highly aesthetic and fully enculturated. Topics include liberation theology, liberation philosophy, critical pedagogy, theopoetics, contextual epistemologies, Latina feminism and mujerista theology, and decolonial thought.

D 4004/D 5004 U.S. Latina Feminist Theologies

This course explores the significant contributions of U.S. Latina feminist theologians, such as María Pilar Aquino, Ada María Isasi-Díaz, Michelle Gonzalez, and Nancy Pineda-Madrid.   We will historicize their contributions by looking at related traditions of feminist thought in Latin America and the United States.  As such, the approach to this class is highly interdisciplinary: we will engage questions of theology, philosophy, Third World Feminism, and post-colonial and decolonial thought.  Students will produce short weekly writing assignments and a final paper of their own design. 

D 4009 Liberation Theology and Religious Faith

This course looks at one of the most important movements of the 20th century and its continuing significance for theology today.  Having emerged in various forms (i.e. Latin American, Black, Latino/a, feminist, etc.), liberation theology stresses that religious faith is not exempt from political questions, it asserts a preferential option for the poor and oppressed, and it affirms the Kingdom of God in the here-and-now.  Special attention will be given to the aesthetic, cultural, and gender dimensions of liberation.

DS 4010 Theology and Spirituality of Religious Priesthood

This course examines the historical and theological origins, development, and spirituality of the ministerial priesthood in consecrated religious life within the context of the common priesthood of all believers and the nature of ministry in the church. It gives special attention to the teachings of Vatican II, post-conciliar theologies of the priesthood, and the identity of the religious presbyter. Furthermore, this course focuses on the spirituality of religious priesthood as expressed in universal church documents and as understood according to the charisms of the particular religious orders, congregations, societies of apostolic life or secular institutes represented in the given semester.

D 4014/D 5014 Christian Faith in a Secular Age

This course offers an examination of the idea of secularism in the context of modern Western society from a theological, philosophical, and sociological perspective. With a focus on Charles Taylor’s epic examination, “A Secular Age,” the course will consider the emergence of secularism in modern society, its significance for theology and philosophy, its social and political dimensions and the risks and possibilities that emerge within a secular society. Additionally, the course will consider the ways in which western secularism stands in tension with ways of understanding the relationship of religion to society in a global context.

D 4017 Karl Barth and Thomas Aquinas: God in Act and Being

In this course, we will compare the theologies of two of the greatest theologians of the Christian tradition: Thomas Aquinas and Karl Barth. Aquinas, the architect of Mediaeval Catholic theology, continues to wield an enormous influence on the Church today, while Karl Barth’s magnum opus, the Church Dogmatic, was a towering achievement of 20th Century theology. In this course, we will focus on how each of them understood and articulated a theology of the nature and being of God. In doing so, we will shed light on the intersections and divergences within the Catholic and Protestant theological traditions.

D 4018 Wake Up the World: Consecrated Life For Our Time

In honor of the Year of Consecrated Life and Pope Francis’ call to “Wake Up the World” this course will look at particular areas that invite “waking up the world” and “waking up consecrated life” for our time. The course will first look at the time we are in, both on local and global levels, in consecrated life and the world in which we live. The course will then look at various areas of consecrated life that are calling for “waking up,” including, but not limited to, mission in local and global context, vows for today, community, ministry, peace-building and care for the earth.  Through lecture, small group discussion and large group engagement, we will consider what we must let go of and open ourselves to in order to live the call we are given by God’s own Spirit for our time. The readings will be related to consecrated life and also include current readings that call forth consecrated life at this time. Included will be Pope Francis’ upcoming document on the environment. The course will be both foundational and capacity building for theologically engaging, creatively imagining and plan building for persons, communities and congregations. The course is open to persons taking this for academic credit and also to auditors.

D 4019 Political Theology as Contextual Theology: J. B. Metz, Jurgen Moltmann and the Theology of Messianic Expectation

This course will examine of the development of the “new political theology” of Johann Baptist Metz and Jürgen Moltmann in the post-World War II era as a form of contextual theology. Through a close reading and comparative analysis of their writing this course will explore how Metz and Moltmann developed their theologies in response to a changing social and political situation. We will also consider the relationship between political theology and the theology of hope, as well as the major critiques of this project from other contextual settings, such as those of feminist, liberationist and public theological approaches.

D 4020 Romero and Ellacuría: Salvation in History

This blended/hybrid course explores the courageous writings and lived witness of two modern-day prophets and martyrs: Óscar Romero (1917-1980) and Ignacio Ellacuría (1930-1989) of El Salvador.  Students will explore the influences that shaped their lives and thinking, critically analyze select texts, and reflect on the ways that their example may continue to prove significant today. In addition to engaging in bi-monthly, seminar-style (i.e. face-to-face) discussions, students will complete short weekly online writing assignments, as well as a final paper of their own design.  

DC 4100 Trinity and Mission: The God of Jesus Christ

This course is an invitation for students to journey into a deeper understanding of God the Trinity whom Christians witness through their lives. It offers a critical and constructive theological reflection on the mystery of the Triune God–a plenitude of self-giving love–in ways that are relevant to the concrete realities of our present world. The course is informed by the perspectives of the practice of ministry, theological method, the history of doctrine, and contextual-intercultural perspectives.

D 4200 Christology

This course provides a systematic treatment of the foundations of Christology in a post-critical context. It is concerned with the possibility of constructing and evaluating Christology after one has subjected the Bible to the analysis of historical-critical studies, and after one has become thoroughly aware of the profound historicity of the Christian faith-community and its doctrines.

DC 4200 Christology and Culture

An investigation of the meaning of the person and work of Jesus Christ for Christian faith today. Special emphasis given to emerging christologies in the World Church, constructing christologies today, and the final consummation of all things in Christ.

DSC 4200/DSC 5200 Sources and Methods in Latin@ Theologies

The integral relationship between the lived daily experiences of Latino/a communities and the theological reflections that emerge from within these contexts is articulated as teología y pastoral en conjunto. This seminar explores sources and methods developed by Latin@ theologians and biblical scholars in their constructing of theological perspectives that recognize this intrinsic connection between theology and  ministry.

D 4202 Ecclesiology/Mariology

This course consists of an historical and systematic study of the understanding of the church in the Christian tradition and in contemporary thought. Special attention is given to ecclesiological themes and issues which are critical for life in the church today and especially Mary, the mother of the church.

DE 4205/5205  Women in Theology and Ethics

Inspired by the outstanding women who have presented the prestigious St. Mary’s College Madeleva Lectures, and women contributing to the excellent volumes produced from conferences of Catholic Theological Ethics in the World Church, this course features women theologians and ethicists from across the globe.  While classes will provide an overview the variety of key contributions from these women, opportunities will be provided for students to have direct contact with one of a select group of theologians (in person or through IT) and sustain a dialogue with her as the student studies her work. Students will present a final project or research paper in which the work of the theologian / ethicist with whom they engaged.

DC 4210 Revelation and Liberation

The seminar will explore how selected theologians from non-Western cultures are proponents of a theology of revelation based on our experience of God’s intervention in human history.

DS 4210/5210 Reconciliation and Forgiveness

An exploration of the theology and ministry of individual and social reconciliation in a variety of settings today: domestic violence, the Church, immigration and urban issues, and post-conflict settings. Issues treated include trauma, healing of memories, truth telling, justice, and forgiveness. May be taken at the Master’s or the Doctoral level.

DH 4220 Rediscovering Vatican II: The Background, the Documents, the Theology

This lecture course will first set the event of Vatican II within its historical context and will offer a brief overview of what happened in the Council’s Four Sessions from 1962 until 1965. It will then reflect on the four major Constitutions that the Council produced–documents on the Liturgy, Revelation, the Church, and the Church in the Modern World–and on selected additional documents, such as those on the Laity, Missionary Activity, Non-Christian Religions, and Religious Freedom. The course will be conducted in two periods. Period One will consist in an hour fifteen minute presentation by a CTU faculty member on a particular document. Then, after a break, students taking the class for credit will spend the remaining time discussing the assigned document and readings.

SD 4310 Spiritual Classics of the Patristic Era

In this course students read and reflect on a selection of the most influential Christian spiritual classics from the Patristic Era (the first six centuries of the Christian era)., including Perpetua, Ignatius of Antioch, Origen, Gregory of Nyssa, Athanasius, Desert Fathers and Mothers, Benedict, Augustine, Pseudo-Dionysius, and others.  Students will have opportunities to practice methods of approaching these texts for spiritual benefit, academic study, and pastoral reappropriation. Themes of history, development of doctrine, physical environment, culture, and gender are also highlighted.

DC 4311 Introduction to Asian Theologies

As Christianity becomes post-western, the church in Asia will have an increasingly significant role in the church of the future. This course is an introduction to the theology emerging from the Asian church. It begins by looking at the context of Asia and then explores how theology addresses the realities of the many poor, many religions, and many cultures of Asia.

D 4336 Theological Anthropology

This course offers an historical and contextual approach to the key themes of theological anthropology including creation, nature, grace, sin, and eschatology, among others. Special attention is given throughout the course to the relationships between theology and science, traditions and cultures, as well as contemporary questions, concerns, and insights about the human person from a Christian perspective in the world church.

DEC 4400 Hope & Solidarity in Global Cinema (Online)

What if cinema can kindle our theological imagination so that we are able to clarify a vision of human hope and solidarity within the contradictions of the world? The course represents an interdisciplinary dialogue between systematic theology and cinema studies. Noteworthy examples of global cinema that spotlight the interweaving issues of culture, class, race, gender, and ecology, are brought into an open-minded but reasoned conversation with a range of theological perspectives that explore the theme of human experience.

D 5001 Theology of Edward Schillebeeckx

Counted among the great theologians of the twentieth century, with more than four hundred published works, Edward Schillebeeckx addresses a wide range of theological questions with great depth and a passionate concern for humanity. The course is an orientation to the main threads of Schillebeeckx’s theology, from his early thomistic frame of reference to his praxis-oriented later theology, which continues to find renewed relevance in the global quest for sociopolitical justice and a “livable humanity.”

BD 5002 The Cross in Scripture and Theology

The cross is the central symbol of the Christian faith. Yet the meaning of the cross has been interpreted in many different ways through the centuries, from a source of scandal to the “tree of life.” In this course, students will explore interpretations of the death of Jesus on the cross, including those found  in the Pauline letters, the Gospels and other New Testament texts, the works of classic Christian thinkers, and the thought of contemporary theologians writing from a variety of perspectives. The goal of this course is to deepen students’ insight into the meaning of the death of Jesus and the symbol of the cross in Christian life, spirituality and preaching.

HD 5010 Theology of the Second Vatican Council (Seminar)

This Seminar will reflect on the history and theology of the Second Vatican Council as found particularly in the four major Constitutions and in selected Decrees and Declarations.

D 5101 God and the Mystery of Human Suffering

The stark reality of human suffering has challenged the minds of philosophers and religious thinkers through the ages. It also engages the minds and hearts of pastoral ministers. In this course, students explore the ways in which the mystery of human suffering has been addressed in the Bible, the theology of the early Church, medieval theology, and by modern thinkers such as Elie Wiesel, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Jürgen Moltmann, Edward Schillebeeckx, Gustavo Gutiérrez, and Elizabeth Johnson. Students are invited to enter into sustained reflection on the way in which they conceive of God’s relation to suffering people.

DE 5200 Methods in Theology and Ethics

In this course, students will become acquainted with the principal methodologies that have been used in recent Roman Catholic theology: in systematic theology, and in theological ethics. Students will be able to compare the strengths and limits of the different methodologies and become more proficient in the critical reading of theological texts.

D 5206 Theologies of Thomas Aquinas and Karl Rahner

The course looks at two important but different theologians. Thomas Aquinas draws from an Aristotelian and medieval world-view. Karl Rahner presents a theology fashioned from the modern world of self and history. Each theologian will be studied out of his historical context and in light of his sources. The focus for both theologies is the presence of God in the world within and beyond creation: what Jesus calls the reign of God and Christians call grace. Other theological areas flow from this.

CD 5210 Theology of Interreligious Dialogue

Takes as starting point the Second Vatican Council’s declaration “Nostra Aetate” to examine the Church’s relations with other religions. Begins with a historical perspective and then looks at the theologies and forms of interreligious dialogue today. The actual praxis of dialogue will be integral to the course.

DC 5310 Interreligious Dialogue in Asia

Explores the theory and praxis of interreligious dialogue, including the influence of personal, social, and extra-religious factors. Taking into account the contextual realities, the texts of Christian scriptures and teachings are investigated to discern the church’s theology of religions.

DC 6000 Theological Anthropology: Intercultural Perspectives on Being Human in the World Church Today

A doctoral seminar in emerging issues in theological anthropology in the World Church today, as well as new challenges to the Christian understanding of the human being. Emphasis is placed on the different contexts in which these issues and challenges are encountered.

CD 6001 Inculturation: Theory and Methods

A seminar intended for doctoral and M.A. students exploring the development of contextual or intercultural theologies in the World Church, with special attention to the theory underlying this development and the methods employed. It serves also as a methods course for D.Min. students concentrating in intercultural ministries.Much misunderstood, inculturation will be carefully explicated, theoretically and practically. Study methods by which Christianity and a culture may actually encounter each other. The outcome (with the Spirit and local people) is a new reality: the People of God Transformed.

DC 6001 History of Religions and Comparative Theology

This course focuses on the historical, critical, and comparative study of religions. It begins by looking at what has come to be known as the History of Religions and especially the history of the academic study of religion. The second part of the course is Comparative Theology and entails reflection on theological themes and methods across religious traditions.

Ethical Studies

Any 4000 level “E” course fulfills the Ethics concentration  requirement.

E 3000 Introduction to Moral Theology

An introduction to the basic themes of the Christian moral life, including its personal, social, and cosmic dimensions. Attention is given to sources, authorities, and methods used in Roman Catholic theological ethics as well as concepts fundamental to the discipline such as freedom and moral agency, moral norms, and moral reasoning.

EMP 4001 Management and Leadership for Ministry

This course explores the responsibility of those called to ministry to provide effective administrative and managerial leadership whether they serve in increasingly complex parishes, religious congregations, diocesan offices, or other Church related organizations. The course gives particular attention to the theological and ethical foundations of pastoral leadership as well as management theory and practice, communications and marketing skills, and fundamental principles of human resource management. It also examines best practices in compliance and organizational ethics with emphasis on mission integration and ongoing professional development of staff.   Fulfills the required MP4310a-f Leadership Skills Workshops.

ES 4002 Ethics, Spirituality, and Global Climate Change

Human-forced global climate change is a reality that Christians cannot ignore. While engaging the scientific, economic, and political realities that show the urgency of climate change issues, the deeper spiritual and moral resources available in the Christian and Roman Catholic traditions explore are explored. Students are assisted in finding ways to integrate their spirituality and ethical practice and to engage in concrete actions that seek resolutions to the many issues global climate change presents to our world.

E 4003 Social Analysis for Pastoral Praxis

The course teaches and utilizes the pastoral spiral steps of experience, social analysis, faith reflection and action. Input, methods and practical ways are offered for parishes, schools, churches and other faith based social service groups to consider the social issues of the day within a faith context. The course examines how we might look at issues such as environmental concerns, immigration, and trafficking of women and children, among others. Practical aims of the course are to give each participant the skills needed to engage various issues and to bring this method to the classroom, the parish and the community. The process is theological and practical and can be used in various faith communities.

E 4004 Catholic Moral Teaching and Public Policy Debates

This course will examine Catholic moral teachings’ contributions to a range of public policy debates on issues such as health care, labor, poverty reduction, human rights, sustainable development, biomedical research, and governance. A global perspective will be taken in examining selected topics. Responses and reports of various bishops’ conferences and Catholic and Christian organizations that focus on these issues will be considered.

E 4008Applied Ethics: Medical and Sexual Ethics for Ministry

This course will examine the ethical principles and methods of the Catholic moral tradition as they are applied in medical and sexual ethics. Consideration will be given to topics such as: beginning of life issues in light of both the Ethical and Religious Directives (ERDs) issued by the USCCB  and teachings on responsible parenthood; end of life issues in light of ERDs; issues in sexuality and sexual ethics to which those in pastoral ministry are often called to respond. Prerequisite: E-3xxx Introduction to Moral Theology.

E 4007 Introduction to Catholic Social Teaching

This course introduces students to the fundamental dimensions of Catholic social ethics.  The four dimensions of Divine Revelation, Magisterial Teaching, theoretical considerations from the social sciences, and the wisdom gleaned from the ministerial experience of the community of faith are the sources introduced here. This course builds upon the wider considerations of Catholic moral theology as it pertains to the social dimensions of the human person and her /his life of faith in the social, political, economic, and ecological world.  Students are introduced to the corpus of the major social encyclicals that guide committed Christian ministry with peoples struggling for justice and yearning for reconciliation in an ecologically threatened and violent world.

E 4200 Ethics of Power and Racial Justice

“Racist ideologies and behavior are long-standing: they are rooted in the reality of sin . . .”     (The Church and Racism, #2). Globally, most experts on racial justice see the Catholic Church primarily among those who “Preach but don’t practice.” In light of this, it is morally imperative for all future ministers to obtain sufficient moral knowledge about the sin of racism and equip themselves with adequate strategies for the task of working for racial justice. This course addresses racial justice using the methods of theology, ethics, and the social sciences. Periodically this course is also offered as a 5000 level seminar for advanced research MA and D. Min. degree students.

DE 4205/5205 Women in Theology and Ethics

Inspired by the outstanding women who have presented the prestigious St. Mary’s College Madeleva Lectures, and women contributing to the excellent volumes produced from conferences of Catholic Theological Ethics in the World Church, this course features women theologians and ethicists from across the globe.  While classes will provide an overview the variety of key contributions from these women, opportunities will be provided for students to have direct contact with one of a select group of theologians (in person or through IT) and sustain a dialogue with her as the student studies her work. Students will present a final project or research paper in which the work of the theologian / ethicist with whom they engaged.

EH 4210 Catholic Social Thought: Movements, Models, & Martyrs

The faith filled contributions of Catholics from a variety of fields of endeavor (beyond theological disciplines) have shaped key principles of Catholic social thought, teachings and action. Such are the influences of the likes of Albert de Munn, Rene de La Tour du Pin, Women of the Plaza de Mayo, Aurora Donoso, religious sisters in Iran – and more.  Their faith-filled action, strategy building, and personal witness has brought to the Church more effective and persuasive means for living the values of the Reign of God in the world and across time.

E 4315 Medical Ethics

This course will examine the general ethical principles and methods that concern the medical profession and the Ethical and Religious Directives issued by the US Catholic Bishops Conference. Consideration will be given to topics such as beginning of life and end of life issues, experimentation with human subjects, genetic engineering, access to health care, and patient autonomy. Prerequisite: E 4000 Introduction to Moral Theology. 

E 4344 Global Economic Justice and Christian Faith

This course will examine the impact of globalization on economic life in light of Christian faith and the call for justice. Consideration will be given to the ethical dimensions of economic activity, to understandings of justice, particularly as expressed in the Catholic social tradition, and to proposals for addressing inequities.

E 4345 Spirituality, Liturgy, and the Quest for Justice

This course looks at ways on integrating spirituality and liturgy with the church’s commitment to the justice in the world. It will examine how classical forms of spiritual development such as the Ignatian Exercises as well as more recent forms of liberationist, ecological and feminist spiritualities can aid the quest for justice. Key figures such as Thomas Merton will also be highlighted. 

E 4400 Care for the Earth: Ethics and the Environment

This course is a basic introduction to environmental ethics. The focus is on the need for Christians to respect the environment and the behaviors that need to follow from that reverence. Various environmenta1 ethics methods are explored. Christian and Jewish sources, especially the Franciscan tradition and Catholic magisterial statements are plumbed.

DEC 4400 Hope & Solidarity in Global Cinema (Online)

What if cinema can kindle our theological imagination so that we are able to clarify a vision of human hope and solidarity within the contradictions of the world? The course represents an interdisciplinary dialogue between systematic theology and cinema studies. Noteworthy examples of global cinema that spotlight the interweaving issues of culture, class, race, gender, and ecology, are brought into an open-minded but reasoned conversation with a range of theological perspectives that explore the theme of human experience.

E 4405 Sexual Ethics for the Christian

This course investigates the Catholic moral tradition, current magisterial teaching, and other elements that form a contemporary Catholic/Christian vision of sexuality and sexual ethics. Attention is given to issues to which those in pastoral ministry are often called to respond. Prerequisite: E 4000 Introduction to Moral Theology.

E 4406 Current Catholic Social Thought: Just War or Just Policing?

How can the Church understand and actuate its mediatory role between God’s offer of peace in Christ in a world fraught with systemic violence (social, cultural, economic, political, and ecological) and that frequently brings nations and peoples to the brink of war?  This course first uses an historical approach to examine critical junctures in the development of biblical and Catholic social teachings, as well as classical Catholic social thought concerning war and peacemaking.  Special attention is given to the on-going ethical development of Just War theories including contemporary proposals concerning “post war justice” and “Just Policing” In the second part of the course students will be assisted in examining a situation of violence or warfare in their context of origin, and to develop their own theological, ethical, and pastoral appropriation of God’s offer of peace in a violent world.

E 4407 Bible and Ethics for Pastoral Ministry

This inter-disciplinary course will explore the many dimensions of the relationship between the Bible and Ethics in the Catholic tradition. It will examine the integration of Scripture and Tradition as a basis for ethical reflection, moral imagination, and pastoral ministry. Topics such as justice, violence, reconciliation, and love will be addressed.

E 5002 Women, Poverty, and Global Justice

In light of Catholic Social Teaching and the call for global justice, this course will examine the issue of poverty by focusing on the causes of poverty among women, who make up half the world’s population but represent 70% of the world’s poor. Consideration will also be given to strategies developed to alleviate poverty, especially poverty among women.

E 5100 Holocaust and Genocide: Ethical Reflections

An examination of major ethical issues arising within the Nazi Holocaust. Topics include anti-Semitism the loss of personal morality, God and ethical decision-making, the importance of ritual in shaping ethical behavior, ethics and unjust structures, and human rights. Ethical issues in modern genocides, such as Rwanda, Bosnia, and Cambodia, are also considered. 

E 5107 Catholic Environmental Ethics: Sources, Norms, and Issues

Catholic theological ethics has always considered care for the Earth as moral imperative. This seminar explores the Catholic doctrinal and moral grounding for dealing with the complex and often perplexing issues that constitute today’s environmental crisis. Key theological and ethical sources and norms are explored using case studies. Students focus their learning on an actual case project in which they demonstrate ways of achieving conversion from our abusive relationships with the Earth, to moral, sustainable and reverential ways of living.

DE 5200 Methods in Theology and Ethics

In this course, students will become acquainted with the principal methodologies that have been used in recent Roman Catholic theology: in systematic theology, and in theological ethics. Students will be able to compare the strengths and limits of the different methodologies and become more proficient in the critical reading of theological texts.

E 5201 Mutuality: Definition and Probative Value

Underlying all talk of power are assumptions that have ruled with unsuspected hegemony.  Many of these assumptions were full of mischief that alienated men/women, humans/nature, affect/ reason, personal/social, sacred/secular, and the like.  Mutuality is a corrective normative category which delimits the role of the moral agent, the use of power, and what is included in moral deciding.  This course will explore what is understood by mutuality and seeks to discover the difference in the process and end of ethical deciding when mutuality is utilized as a formal norm within a Christian ethical framework.  The work of Harrison, Heyward, Johnson, Ruether, Cahill, and Farley receives special attention.

E 5204 Love and Justice

Various ethical systems have developed around the central theme of love or of justice or their interaction. Differences in the understanding of these concepts constitute different approaches to morality. This seminar analyzes, compares, and critically assesses the ways in which these themes function in Christian ethics and theology.

E 5208 Conscience: Historical and Contemporary Views

This course will explore the concept of conscience. It will examine historical accounts of conscience and the way in which understandings of conscience have developed in the Catholic moral tradition. The relationship of conscience to mature moral development and virtuous character formation will also be considered.

Historical Studies

EH 4210 Catholic Social Thought: Movements, Models, & Martyrs

The faith filled contributions of Catholics from a variety of fields of endeavor (beyond theological disciplines) have shaped key principles of Catholic social thought, teachings and action. Such are the influences of the likes of Albert de Munn, Rene de La Tour du Pin, Women of the Plaza de Mayo, Aurora Donoso, religious sisters in Iran – and more.  Their faith-filled action, strategy building, and personal witness has brought to the Church more effective and persuasive means for living the values of the Reign of God in the world and across time.

DH 4220 Rediscovering Vatican II: The Background, the Documents, the Theology

This lecture course will first set the event of Vatican II within its historical context and will offer a brief overview of what happened in the Council’s Four Sessions from 1962 until 1965. It will then reflect on the four major Constitutions that the Council produced–documents on the Liturgy, Revelation, the Church, and the Church in the Modern World–and on selected additional documents, such as those on the Laity, Missionary Activity, Non-Christian Religions, and Religious Freedom. The course will be conducted in two periods. Period One will consist in an hour fifteen minute presentation by a CTU faculty member on a particular document. Then, after a break, students taking the class for credit will spend the remaining time discussing the assigned document and readings.

CH 4301 Constants in Context: A Mission Theology for Today

Weaving together a systematic theology with mission at its core and a global history of the world Christian movement, this course traces the patterns by which theological constants are shaped in changing contexts in developing relevant mission theologies.

SH 5001 Christian History and Spirituality through Art and Architecture in Italy

A handful of significant cities have been the backdrop for many of the important events and people that have shaped our Christian faith. This interdisciplinary course studies significant moments, movements and figures pertaining to our history and spirituality. This two-week course takes place in the Italian cities of Rome, Assisi, and Florence. Students learn on site about the role of art and architecture in promoting the Christian faith. (Taught every two years)

HD 5010 Theology of the Second Vatican Council (Seminar)

This Seminar will reflect on the history and theology of the Second Vatican Council as found particularly in the four major Constitutions and in selected Decrees and Declarations.

CH 5322 The History of Muslim-Christian Relations

An investigation of Christian-Muslim relations from the early seventh century CE to the present. Specific contexts of focus include but are not limited to: the early Muslim conquests, the Crusades and the fall of Constantinople, the Bosnian genocide, twentieth-century Algeria, contemporary West Africa, contemporary Southeast Asia, contemporary Palestine, and the rise of Islamophobia in contemporary Europe and the U.S.

Intercultural Studies and Ministry

C 3000 World Christianity in Intercultural and Interreligious Perspective

In this course students will be introduced to Christianity as the truly global phenomenon it has always been. Students will explore how historical and cultural context shapes religious experience, in general, and how it shapes ways of being Christian, in particular. Special attention will be given to diversity within the Catholic tradition, the diversity of other Christian confessions (i.e., ecumenism), and the ways in which Christian communities have developed and continue to evolve in interaction with communities of other faiths.

SC 4002  The Spiritual Writings of Sr. Thea Bowman and Howard Thurman

This course is an introduction to the spiritual writings of African American theologians and scholars  – Sr. Thea Bowman and theologian Dr. Howard Thurman.  The class will focus on their writings on the spiritual life, community and justice and through prayer, lecture, small group discussion, multimedia presentations and other various methods, offer the student resources for understanding the impact of Sr. Thea and Howard Thurman on the spiritual life of contemporary Christians.

C 4003 Abraham’s Children: Jews, Christians, and Muslims

Open to participants from any faith or philosophical background, “Abraham’s Children” is designed to introduce some of the basic elements of the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim faith traditions through the lens and dynamic of interreligious relations and understanding. Those who complete the course will have had the experience of studying Judaism, Christianity, and Islam from the perspectives of history and theology and also in an experiential setting with faculty and colleagues of all three faiths. Students will also have the opportunity for encountering aspects of these living faith communities in the “field” of the Greater Chicago Area.

C 4008 Buddhist-Christian Dialogue

In a time of great global challenges– wars, economic exploitation and environmental degradation–it has become imperative that religious traditions learn to work together to create a peaceful world.  This course looks at a variety of ways in which Christians and Buddhists have learned from one another.  It culminates in an exploration of two complementary types of moral agents: the prophet and the bodhisattva.

C4014 Islam, Muslims, & Islamophobia: a Catholic Response

This is a six-week crash course in the epidemic of Islamophobia in contemporary U.S. American society. Its aim is: to assess the extent of the problem, including statistics regarding anti-Muslim hate crimes and an analysis of the so-called “Islamophobia industry”; to explore and deconstruct negative and harmful anti-Muslim stereotypes, particularly as key elements of dominant mainstream media, “alt-right” media, and social media narratives; and to articulate a ‘Catholic response’ based on Catholic social teaching, theology of interreligious dialogue, and the longstanding praxis of Catholic-Muslim dialogue in the U.S. in which Catholic Theological Union has played a significant role.

DC 4100 Trinity and Mission: The God of Jesus Christ

This course is an invitation for students to journey into a deeper understanding of God the Trinity whom Christians witness through their lives. It offers a critical and constructive theological reflection on the mystery of the Triune God–a plenitude of self-giving love–in ways that are relevant to the concrete realities of our present world. The course is informed by the perspectives of the practice of ministry, theological method, the history of doctrine, and contextual-intercultural perspectives.

MPC 4103 Pastoral Ministry in U.S. Hispanic/Latino@ Contexts (3 credits) 
Demographics indicate that Latin@s currently constitute the largest and fastest growing population in the U.S. Catholic church. This course privileges Latin@ theological scholarship and explores the histories, experiences, and diversity of these communities and the implications for pastoral ministry. *MAPS students may use this course to fulfill Level 1 requirement.

**Required Level 1 course for MA-HTM.

SC 4110 Black Spirituality

Black spirituality engages the mind, heart and spirit in a dynamic union with the transcendent and immanent God, as experienced in the heart of community. It is rooted in the history and experience of African peoples in the United States as well as in the Caribbean, and Latin America. Using various resources and methods (prayers, slave narratives, autobiographies, and more) this course will engage students in a critical examination of the roots, development and characteristics of the spirituality of African peoples (primarily in the United States).

SMPC 4132/5132/– Black Spirituality as a Source for Ministry

Black spirituality engages the mind, heart and spirit in a dynamic union with the transcendent and immanent God, as experienced in the heart of community.  It is rooted in the history and experience of African American peoples in the United States.  Using various resources and methods (Prayers, preaching, song, spiritual autobiographies, biographies, slave narratives, spiritual interviews and film), this course will engage students in a critical examination of the roots, development and characteristics of the spirituality of African Americans, as well as a participative experience of Black spirituality as found in the religious expression of the community and ministries.

SC 4190 Guadalupe and Marian Spirituality

This Course considers how our Lady of Guadalupe fits into and breaks out of traditional Marian Spirituality within Christianity. Particular attention will be given to the themes of historical development, inculturation, evangelization and social justice. The course will be a conducted in a combination of lecture, group discussion and student led Marian celebrations.

DC 4200 Christology and Culture

An investigation of the meaning of the person and work of Jesus Christ for Christian faith today. Special emphasis given to emerging christologies in the World Church, constructing christologies today, and the final consummation of all things in Christ.

DSC 4200/DSC5200 Sources and Methods in Latin@ Theologies

The integral relationship between the lived daily experiences of Latino/a communities and the theological reflections that emerge from within these contexts is articulated as teología y pastoral en conjunto. This seminar explores sources and methods developed by Latin@ theologians and biblical scholars in their constructing of theological perspectives that recognize this intrinsic connection between theology and  ministry.

DC 4210 Revelation and Liberation

The seminar will explore how selected theologians from non-Western cultures are proponents of a theology of revelation based on our experience of God’s intervention in human history.

CH 4301 Constants in Context: A Mission Theology for Today

Weaving together a systematic theology with mission at its core and a global history of the world Christian movement, this course traces the patterns by which theological constants are shaped in changing contexts in developing relevant mission theologies.

CW4301 Initiation and Contextualization

After studying the general characteristics of Christian initiation and other types of initiation as cultural-religious phenomena in a variety of historical contexts, this seminar focuses on theological, cultural, liturgical and pastoral issues in the holistic process of contextualizing initiation in particular Christian contexts.

MPC 4308 Pastoral Care in an African-American Context (3 credits) 
Explores the psychological and cultural elements that contributed to the formation of an African-American identity. The goal is a better understanding of the African-American experience and a greater sensitivity to the strength and needs of this cultural tradition. Students develop a better understanding/ability to minister in the African-American community.

C 4309 Mission Integration

Integrating seminar for those returning from cross-cultural and/or overseas training placements (OTP) of mission/ministry. This course provides a process for deeper understanding of the experience through theological reflection and integration of the past, present, and future.

DC 4311 Introduction to Asian Theologies

As Christianity becomes post-western, the church in Asia will have an increasingly significant role in the church of the future. This course is an introduction to the theology emerging from the Asian church. It begins by looking at the context of Asia and then explores how theology addresses the realities of the many poor, many religions, and many cultures of Asia.

C 4320 Introduction to Islam

This introduction to the faith tradition of nearly one-fifth of humanity includes: the life of Muhammad (s.); Qur’an and hadith; the five “pillars” of Muslim praxis; Islamic law and theology; Sunni/Shi`ite sectarianism; mysticism; and contemporary Muslim renewal and reform movements.

C 4325 Introduction to Judaism

Designed to introduce the most important aspects of Jewish practice and belief, particularly stresses questions and problems relevant to contemporary Jews, while setting them within a historical context. Considers issues in the relationship between Judaism and Christianity, including the dialogue that has developed in recent decades.

C 4330 Interreligious Dialogue

Participants investigate forms of dialogue with other religions developed in Catholic Christianity since Vatican II. Attention is given to the dialogue of religious experience and a comparative theology arising from the practice of dialogue. Field trips and various media formats are employed.

DEC 4400 Hope & Solidarity in Global Cinema (Online)

What if cinema can kindle our theological imagination so that we are able to clarify a vision of human hope and solidarity within the contradictions of the world? The course represents an interdisciplinary dialogue between systematic theology and cinema studies. Noteworthy examples of global cinema that spotlight the interweaving issues of culture, class, race, gender, and ecology, are brought into an open-minded but reasoned conversation with a range of theological perspectives that explore the theme of human experience.

C 4700 Praxis for Intercultural Transformation

This course is designed to afford students in-depth experience-based preparation for intercultural mission and ministry. The course focuses on the necessity of developing and maintaining a commitment to on-going personal transformation from all forms of ethnocentrism and prejudice as an indispensible element of such preparation. The three principal components of the course are: preparation and orientation for an intensive field experience; an actual field experience; and post-experience integration. The field component has two options: 1) a traveling seminar to the Rosebud and Pine Ridge Reservations in South Dakota, led by our Lakota (Sioux) teachers; or 2) a selection of intercultural and/or interreligious experiences in the Greater Chicago Area developed in consultation between the student and the instructors.

C 5004 The Church and Indigenous Peoples

Offered as a study trip to the diocese of San Cristobal de Las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico, this course includes a series of lectures and community visits to give participants an overview of the relation between the Church and the Indigenous peoples of the Americas, through the experience of different Mayan Christian communities in that region. Organized in collaboration with several organizations in that local church, a main focus of the course is to help participants understand the past and present struggle of the Indigenous peoples for justice, peace and dignity in the church and society. A special attention will be given to studying the emerging processes of intercultural theology and pastoral ministry in this context.

C 5006 Community Organizing: Interreligious Perspective & Practice

This course has two basic aims. The first is to give students an opportunity for interreligious theological analysis of pressing issues of social justice, particularly surrounding race and the problem of “whiteness” in the history of U.S. American society. The second is to provide training in the practice known as faith-based “community organizing.” Accompanied by a white Catholic and an African American Muslim instructor, students will explore the deep social justice themes in the life of the Prophet Muhammad (s.) and Jesus of Nazareth, as well as place into conversation the work of prominent African American Christian and African American Muslim liberation theologians. They will also undertake training in community organizing in the tradition of Saul Alinsky and Ed Chambers as adapted by the Inner City Muslim Action Network of Chicago’s Southside.

C 5008Community Organizing: Project Practicum  Students will also have the option of a taking an additional 1.5 credit hour practicum course designed to give students an opportunity to conduct a proposed community organizing project.

CS 5010 Spirituality, Ministry, and Survivors of Human Rights Abuse

The prevalence of torture, human rights abuses and violence in our world challenges the missionary/minister to understand the personal and societal effects of trauma and to develop a spirituality of accompaniment with survivors in their healing and reconciliation. Not open to audit.

C 5020 Christianity in the Middle East

The course examines key historical and cultural developments of Christianity in what is today known as the Middle East since the late modern period. Students are introduced to the history of the relation between Eastern Christians communities and the West, particularly during the colonial period. A main focus of the second part of the course is on the current situation of the Christian communities and on the emerging theological and cultural debates concerning their identity and future mission.

CS 5020 Spirituality, Discipleship, and Mission Today

This course explores discipleship in the New Testament, seeking its applications amid changing lives and in a changing world. First, we are called, then sent; the initiative and the agenda are not our own. Ponder the implications and applications

C 5030 Theologies of Peace in Intercultural Perspective

Constructing local, contextual theologies of peacemaking is necessary for developing relevant pastoral responses to complex conflicts and experiences of violence—economic, cultural, military, political, religious, ethnic, ecological, etc. Realizing that the ministry of peacemaking is often an ecumenical, intercultural, and interreligious task, building on case studies from different parts of the world this seminar will help students develop theological imagination and pastoral methods for promoting praxes of peacemaking as an integral part of the mission and ministry of local churches.

CS 5030 The Spirituality of Lakota-Christian Dialogue

In dialogue with Native Americans (Lakota) who practice traditional spirituality and/or Christian faith, this course examines a spirituality of justice and interfaith mission/ministry. Includes a week-long field trip on Rosebud and Pine Ridge Lakota Reservations in South Dakota.

SC 5040 Islamic Mysticism and Spirituality

An exploration of the Muslim traditions of piety, devotion, and spiritual purification known as “Sufism.” Topics include: early Muslim asceticism; love mysticism; sobriety and ecstasy; the stages and states of the spiritual journey; Sufi prayer and praxis; and classical Sufi poetry.

C 5041 Contemporary Islamic Renewal and Reform Movements

A thoughtful perspective on what is popularly called Islamic “fundamentalism.” This course examines the phenomenon as a response to the effects of western modernity and modernism. It also explores the spectrum of such movements ranging from progressive to extremist.

MPC 5101 Pastoral Ministry in U.S. Asian and Pacific Island Contexts (3 credits) 
Asian and Pacific Island populations are a growing presence within the U.S. Catholic church. This course explores the histories, experiences, and diversity of these communities and the implications for pastoral ministry.

MPC 5103 Pastoral Ministry in U.S. Hispanic/Latin@ Contexts (3 credits) 
Demographics indicate that Latin@s currently constitute the largest and fastest growing population in the U.S. Catholic church. This course privileges Latin@ theological scholarship and explores the histories, experiences, and diversity of these communities, and the implications for pastoral ministry.

SC 5190 Santa María de Guadalupe y Tepeyac y Chicago**

This course reviews the history of Guadalupe and other American Marian events in light of their socio-implications on Christian spirituality. It will consider both Latin American, US American and Latina/o devotion to María as mother of God and sister in the lucha (struggle for justice).

WC 5202 Liturgical Inculturation
This seminar explores the inculturation of the church’s worship in both historical and contemporary perspective with emphasis on current methodological and theological issues raised by the engagement of the church with contemporary cultures promoted by Vatican II. (3 credits)

WC 5205 Liturgy in a Multicultural Community
This seminar explores the complex situation of liturgical celebration in communities comprising people of diverse languages and cultural backgrounds. It takes up the dynamics of intercultural engagement; assumptions, principles, and critiques relating to multiculturalism; importance of popular religiosity; and contemporary models for liturgy that embrace the plurality of cultures in a respectful, inclusive way. (3 credits)

CD 5210 – Theology of Interreligious Dialogue

Takes as starting point the Second Vatican Council’s declaration Nostra Aetate to examine the Church’s relations with other religions. Begins with a historical perspective and then looks at the theologies and forms of interreligious dialogue today. Discussing examples of actual praxes of dialogue from different parts around the world will be integral to the course.

WSC 5301 Prayer Patterns in the Abrahamic Traditions
This seminar course will examine the development of (non-eucharistic) liturgical prayer patterns in the Abrahamic traditions from ancient Temple and Synagogue prayer patterns into the 21st century.  This historical-contextual approach will provide a framework for inquiring to what extent there can be said to be implied spiritualities in the form, structure and performance of these prayer patterns, and how such might shed light on the evolving prayer practices of these traditions today.  Historical work will be complemented by shared theological reflection on the patterns we examine. (3 credits)

DC 5310 Interreligious Dialogue in Asia

Explores the theory and praxis of interreligious dialogue, including the influence of personal, social, and extra-religious factors. Taking into account the contextual realities, the texts of Christian scriptures and teachings are investigated to discern the church’s theology of religions.

DC 5311 Readings in Asian Theology

This is a reading course on the writings of key Christian theologians– especially on how they address the issues arising from the context and realities of Asia. Among the major themes examined from an Asian perspective are post-colonialism, contextualization, hermeneutics, theological methods, inculturation, integral liberation, and interreligious dialogue.

CH 5322 The History of Muslim-Christian Relations

An investigation of Christian-Muslim relations from the early seventh century CE to the present. Specific contexts of focus include but are not limited to: the early Muslim conquests, the Crusades and the fall of Constantinople, the Bosnian genocide, twentieth-century Algeria, contemporary West Africa, contemporary Southeast Asia, contemporary Palestine, and the rise of Islamophobia in contemporary Europe and the U.S.

DC 6000 Theological Anthropology in Intercultural Perspective

A doctoral seminar in emerging issues in theological anthropology in the World Church today, as well as new challenges to the Christian understanding of the human being. Emphasis is placed on the different contexts in which these issues and challenges are encountered.

CD 6001 Inculturation: Theory and Methods

A seminar intended for doctoral and M.A. students exploring the development of contextual or intercultural theologies in the World Church, with special attention to the theory underlying this development and the methods employed. It serves also as a methods course for D.Min. students concentrating in intercultural ministries.Much misunderstood, inculturation will be carefully explicated, theoretically and practically. Study methods by which Christianity and a culture may actually encounter each other. The outcome (with the Spirit and local people) is a new reality: the People of God Transformed.

DC 6001 History of Religions and Comparative Theology

This course is an advanced seminar designed to introduce students to the development and content of two major research traditions which continue to have tremendous influence on the study of religious pluralism, and especially the nature and substance of interreligious dialogue. In the first part of the course, students will explore the foundations of the “history of religions” as an effort to explain and understand “religion” from a perspective independent of any theological framework or faith commitment. In the second part of the course, students will turn to and exploration of “comparative theology” as a methodology of placing specific elements of one’s own faith tradition into deep dialogue with analogous elements in another faith tradition. 

Pastoral Ministry

MP 3000 Theology and Practice of Ministry (3 credits)
Explores ministry as daily lived experiences of accompanying particular communities and individuals within the diversity of the Roman Catholic tradition. Attention is given to the relationship between theology and ministry, ecclesiological dimensions of ministry, and  the functions of ministry. Students develop means and resources for cultivating ministerial identity, collaborative leadership, pastoral strategies, intercultural and contextual competencies.

*Option to fulfill MDiv and MAPS level 1 requirement.

MP 3001 Pastoral Ministry in Ordinary Time (3 credits)
Explores the opportunities, challenges, and daily realities experienced in the contextual practice of ministry with communities of faith. The course considers theological foundations of ministry as accompaniment; develops critical and analytical skills necessary for ministry; and examines cultural and contextual dimensions of ministerial and communal identities.

*Option to fulfill MDiv and MAPS level 1 requirement.

WMP 4000 Communication Skills for Ministry (3 credits)
This practical, hands-on course cultivates the skills of scripture proclamation; the development of oral and multimedia presentations for teaching and faith formation; the facilitation of interpersonal communication in difficult conversations; the use of old and new media in facilitating small group discussions in intercultural contexts; the role of the visual arts and music in worship, teaching, and pastoral communication; the writing and production of digital media for parish communication in print and online; and the pastoral planning of internal and external communications.

EMP 4001 Management and Leadership for Ministry

This course explores the responsibility of those called to ministry to provide effective administrative and managerial leadership whether they serve in increasingly complex parishes, religious congregations, diocesan offices, or other Church related organizations. The course gives particular attention to the theological and ethical foundations of pastoral leadership as well as management theory and practice, communications and marketing skills, and fundamental principles of human resource management. It also examines best practices in compliance and organizational ethics with emphasis on mission integration and ongoing professional development of staff.   Fulfills the required MP4310a-f Leadership Skills Workshops.

MP 4001 Current Trends in Theological Reflection  (1.5 credits)

Theological Reflection is a critical tool for ministry. This course provides a foundation for understanding its goals, methods and applications. Students will explore multiple current methods, adapt them for various ministerial contexts, and develop skills in forming and facilitating theological reflection in their ministry praxis.

MPC 4103 /5103 Pastoral Ministry in U.S. Hispanic/Latino@ Contexts (3 credits) 
Demographics indicate that Latin@s currently constitute the largest and fastest growing population in the U.S. Catholic church. This course privileges Latin@ theological scholarship and explores the histories, experiences, and diversity of these communities and the implications for pastoral ministry. *MAPS students may use this course to fulfill Level 1 requirement.

**Required Level 1 course for MA-HTM.

EMP 4100 Catholic Social Teaching and Mission: Living the Values of the Reign of God

This course is one of three “integrating courses” that are built around several elements that make up the evangelizing mission of the church. Integrating courses integrate the four perspectives that make up the foundational courses: pastoral identity, methodological skill, contextual awareness and knowledge of Christian Tradition. The focus of this particular course is the tradition of the social teaching of the Catholic Church and how it contributes to the church’s mission of justice, peace, the integrity of creation, and reconciliation.

MP 4306 Pastoral Ministry: Developing Skills and Competencies for Cooperative Leadership (3 credits) 
Explores ministry as an experience of accompaniment with shared responsibilities and accountabilities. Attention is given to means and resources for cultivating effective leadership styles, developing pastoral plans and strategies, creating and sustaining networks, and addressing conflict and boundary situations.

MP 4307 Pastoral Ministry: Care, Counseling, and Presence (3 credits) 
Explores ministry from the perspectives of providing care, counseling, and presence within the context of a faith community. Each of these aspects of ministry is examined with respect to the skills, resources, networks, and theological understandings necessary for effective pastoral responses.

MPC 4308 Pastoral Care in an African-American Context (3 credits) 
Explores the psychological and cultural elements that contributed to the formation of an African-American identity. The goal is a better understanding of the African-American experience and a greater sensitivity to the strength and needs of this cultural tradition. Students develop a better understanding/ability to minister in the African-American community.

MP 4309  Pastoral Ministry as Justice Praxis: Topic (credits 1.5, summer) 
Explores the theological frameworks, means, and resources for empowering ministers and communities to engage justly on particular topics. Attention is given to Catholic social teaching as it is lived in witness and in practice. Practical skills and competencies include but are not limited to community organizing, preaching and teaching.

MP 4311 Pastoral Ministry across Generations (3 credits) 
Explores theological frameworks, means and resources for ministering to individuals and communities across the age spectrum. Pastoral responses that address specific and developmental needs will be considered as well as those creating opportunities for nurturing healthy intergenerational relationships.

SMP4312 – Spirituality of Family for Ministry
This course takes a look at spirituality and ministry through the lens of family. It will begin by tracing the traditional as well as newer practices of spirituality and how they engage children and family. Next the course will explore elements of spirituality that are inherent in the experience of families. Finally students will develop a spiritual theology of ministry to inform how they respond ministerially to the spiritual needs of families in parish and community contexts.

MPC 5101 Pastoral Ministry in U.S. Asian and Pacific Island Contexts (3 credits) 
Asian and Pacific Island populations are a growing presence within the U.S. Catholic church. This course explores the histories, experiences, and diversity of these communities and the implications for pastoral ministry.

MP 5102 Pastoral Ministry on Campus (3 credits) 
Explores theological frameworks, means and resources for developing strategies, creating networks, and providing pastoral ministry in educational contexts and within academic communities.

MP 5103 Pastoral Ministry in Healthcare (3 credits) 
Explores theological understandings and pastoral ministry within contexts of healthcare. This course seeks to better understand health and health care in a holistic way; to encourage advocacy on a variety of health-related issues; to promote wellness in all dimensions of health—mental, physical, emotional, social, and spiritual. Attention will be given to means and resources for cultivating effective pastoral ministry with regards to issues and contexts such as aging, chronic illness, hospitals, hospice, mental health, and navigating the healthcare system.

MP 5104 Pastoral Ministry with Contemporary Families (3 credits)
Pastoral ministry with families involves sensitivity to diverse cultural backgrounds while being able to minister effectively in response to the many complex challenges families face such as addiction, domestic abuse, mental and physical health, aging, immigration, poverty and joblessness. This course prepares students with the knowledge, skills, and resources necessary   to be more pastorally effective in accompanying contemporary families.

SMPC 5132/4132 – Black Spirituality as a Source for Ministry
Black spirituality engages the mind, heart and spirit in a dynamic union with the transcendent and immanent God, as experienced in the heart of community.  It is rooted in the history and experience of African American peoples in the United States.  Using various resources and methods (Prayers, preaching, song, spiritual autobiographies, biographies, slave narratives, spiritual interviews and film), this course will engage students in a critical examination of the roots, development and characteristics of the spirituality of African Americans, as well as a participative experience of Black spirituality as found in the religious expression of the community and ministries.

Philosophy

P 2100 History of Ancient Philosophy
Probes the question of what philosophers do and why. With some treatment of the pre-Socratic tradition and the influence of the ancient Asian tradition, the major focus is on the epistemology of Plato and the metaphysics and ethics of Aristotle.

P 2102 History of Modern Philosophy
Major figures discussed include Descartes, the English and Continental rationalists, the empiricists, Kant, Hegel and Marx, Feurebach, and Nietzsche. Particular emphasis is given to the impact of these philosophical positions on the doing of theology.

P 2103 History of Contemporary Philosophy
Highlights the issue of language in linguistic analysis, particularly the work of Russell, Ayer, Wittgenstein, Husserl, Heidegger, Derrida, and Levinas. Studies the emergence of existential phenomenology in Sartre, the process philosophy of V. Whitehead, and emerging contributions of contemporary Asian, African, and Latin American philosophical movements.

P 2110 History of Medieval Philosophy
Focuses on the interaction between philosophy and theology in the construction of major styles of logic and theology from the twelfth to fourteenth centuries. Questions are viewed from the Jewish, Islamic, and Christian perspectives with a study of key representatives of these traditions. Vital for students considering further studies in patristics.

P 2180 Philosophy for Future Theologians
Traces the history of the relationship between theology (faith) and philosophy (reason or the intellect). Studies the impact of key philosophical thinkers on the methods and history of theology. Introduces students to the growing convergence between philosophers and theologians in the face of contemporary issues. Special attention given to the role of scientific methodologies and their consequences for the future study of systematic, biblical, and pastoral theology.

P 2220 Critical Thinking and Applied Logic
Introductory course focuses on the problem of human knowledge and cognitive claims as responses to skepticism. Covers the structure of argument, fallacy detection, and truth analysis. Considers the role of logic in shaping worldviews, text books, media coverage, and intercultural epistemology.

P 2221 Philosophy of the Human Person
Beginning with Socrates up to Simone De Beauvoir and the cyber-post moderns, explores historically the various dimensions of what it means to be human and to know humanity. Considers topics such as the will, body-mind dualism, conscience, the ego, sexuality, individual as person, action, and the structure of community.

P 2222 American Philosophy and the History of Social Institutions
Explores the relationship between American theorists (Peirce, James, Royce, and Dewey) and the shaping and maintenance of American cultural and social institutions. Considers the relationship between immigrant narratives, their art, and religion in the “American Institution.”

P 2223 Philosophy of Art
Examines the key role of various aesthetical theories and their roles in answering “what is art?” Attention is given to the role of criticism, taste, multimedia art, icons, also the non-plastic arts such as music, dance, and drama in shaping the expressive dimension of the human person and his or her multifaceted, transnational culture. Interaction with various art institutions and artists in Chicago is expected.

P 2300 Philosophical Ethics
Traditional Catholic ethics has based itself on the history and development of the natural law theory. This course traces the development of the human person as ethical subject. Various contemporary positions of ethics are also present. Special attention to the thought of Bernard Lonergan and his influence on ethical decision making.

P 2301 Perspectives in the Philosophy of Death
Starting with the death of Socrates, Jesus, the Buddha, and Mohammed, philosophers have considered the question of death and afterlife to be a core metaphysical question. Using Heidegger’s phenomenological method, explores various cultural, religious, and philosophical perspectives concerning death and “the beyond.” Explores the “denial of death” in a post holocaust world. Asks whether an appropriate philosophy of death necessarily shapes one’s philosophy of life.

P 2302 Issues in Philosophical Hermeneutics
Surveys the history of hermeneutics and addresses such concepts as the canon in conflicting meanings, the role of interpretation, feminist and contextual hermeneutics, the hermeneutics of suspicion and generosity, and participatory hermeneutics. Presents the repercussions of the history of hermeneutics of contemporary theology.

P 2304 Philosophy of God
Examines the problem of God, the proofs for God’s existence, and the naming of the transcendent deity in eastern and western cultures. Using the phenomenological method, explores the philosophical structure of thought which underpins the study of theos and logos.

P 2305 The Phenomenology of Religion
An introduction to the method of phenomenology as applied to the manifestation of religion. Topics such as myth, taboo, the holy, the sacred, the ritual, and sacred texts are presented. The positions of Otto, Eliade, van der Leeuw, Malinowski, Smart and Smith, and Durkheim are considered. Opportunity to interact with the various religious organizations in Chicago.

P 2350 Philosophy of Science
Examines the basic structure of scientific method and the major theories of modern physics within that context. This is treated with a view to the historical, philosophical and social implications of the practice of science in its contemporary form. Special attention is given to the several key contemporary scientific theorists, especially Thomas Kuhn.

P 2400 Philosophical Texts: Thomas Aquinas
A detailed study of the key concepts and texts of this important philosopher and theologian. The movements of original Thomism and neo-thomism are presented.

P 2401 Philosophical Texts: Augustine’s Confessions
Aims at a close reading of the work and life of a major philosophical figure pertinent either to classical or contemporary philosophical thought.

P2402 Political PhilosophyThis course explores, in both topical and historical manners, central themes, concepts, and reasoning strategies in political philosophy.  Included are investigations into the justification and scope of governmental authority and the application of philosophical theory to past and current topics, e.g., activism, disobedience, and revolution.

P 2403 Philosophical Texts: International Readings in Political Philosophy
Analyzes key texts and thinkers that continue to shape the political and socioeconomic thinking of western and non-western countries. Considers the relationship between philosophy and democracy, culture, methods of social liberation, development, international conflict and peace, minority and majority rights.

Spirituality Studies

S 3000 – Introduction to the Christian Spiritual Life

This course is an introduction to Christian spirituality and the practices and values that comprise it.  The course offers a survey and a taste of the components that are included in the five aspects of the spiritual journey: context, participants, content, process and aspiration.  These will be considered in both their traditional and contemporary expression.  Special attention will be on spiritual practices and disciplines, discernment, the spiritual journey and health as one journeys in the spiritual life.

S 3002 – Spirituality and Justice

This course proposes an alternative to individualistic understandings of spirituality by examining the theological relationship between Christian spirituality and justice. Two distinct yet fundamentally related questions are considered: (1) what is meant by an authentic Christian spirituality? and (2) what is meant by justice in the context of transforming society and history? In order to unpack these questions, primary sources including, but not limited to, biblical texts, magisterial documents, and key figures in the development of spirituality are critically engaged.

S 3001 – Spiritual Companioning for Ministry

Both in daily life and in explicit ministry, Christians are frequently called upon to offer a companioning presence to people who are concerned about spiritual issues.  Students in this course develop an understanding of this “everyday” ministry and practice the skills that will help them exercise it more fruitfully.  Themes include how to listen well, presence to those different from oneself, varieties of religious experience, working with images and stories, and discernment.  The course design includes input, discussion, and practicum.

SC 4002  The Spiritual Writings of Sr. Thea Bowman and Howard Thurman

This course is an introduction to the spiritual writings of African American theologians and scholars  – Sr. Thea Bowman and theologian Dr. Howard Thurman.  The class will focus on their writings on the spiritual life, community and justice and through prayer, lecture, small group discussion, multimedia presentations and other various methods, offer the student resources for understanding the impact of Sr. Thea and Howard Thurman on the spiritual life of contemporary Christians.

ES 4002 Ethics, Spirituality, and Global Climate Change

Human-forced global climate change is a reality that Christians cannot ignore. While engaging the scientific, economic, and political realities that show the urgency of climate change issues, the deeper spiritual and moral resources available in the Christian and Roman Catholic traditions explore are explored. Students are assisted in finding ways to integrate their spirituality and ethical practice and to engage in concrete actions that seek resolutions to the many issues global climate change presents to our world.

S 4010 Spirituality, Ministry and Survivors of Human Rights Abuses

A seminar combining theory and praxis with Chicago agencies and groups working with refugees/ survivors of torture and human rights abuses. What is our pastoral responsibility in accompanying survivors on their journey to healing and reconciliation? What are the possibilities and limitations of this ministry (personally and collectively)? What is a spirituality of accompaniment? What is a spirituality of reconciliation? What is beyond reconciliation? How does this process inform and challenge our theology, mission and ministry? How do we attend to our own healing process? How do we deal with the oppressor/wrongdoer/perpetrator? These are the questions and concerns that our class-community will address during this semester. Admission by consent of instructor

DS 4010: “Theology and Spirituality of Religious Priesthood”

This course examines the historical and theological origins, development, and spirituality of the ministerial priesthood in consecrated religious life within the context of the common priesthood of all believers and the nature of ministry in the church. It gives special attention to the teachings of Vatican II, post-conciliar theologies of the priesthood, and the identity of the religious presbyter. Furthermore, this course focuses on the spirituality of religious priesthood as expressed in universal church documents and as understood according to the charisms of the particular religious orders, congregations, societies of apostolic life or secular institutes represented in the given semester.

S 4020 Introduction to the Christian Spiritual Life

In this course students will be introduced to the context, participants, content, process and aspiration of Christian spirituality. These will be considered in both their traditional and contemporary expressions.  The course will familiarize students with Christian Traditions like the Three-Fold Way, asceticism, prayer, charity, and justice.  Students will be encouraged to consider how their own spiritual life is progressing.

S 4100 The Spiritual Life: A Latino/a Perspective

This is not a course on Hispanic spirituality, rather this course looks at the whole of Christian Spirituality from a Latino/a perspective and highlighting the contributions made by Hispanics like Isidro de Sevilla, Ignacio de Loyola, Pedro de Alcantara, Teresa de Avila and others to Christian Spirituality.

WS 4100 Liturgy, Prayer, and Contemplation: Ecclesial Spirituality

This course helps students integrate and communicate an understanding of individual and communal prayer as formation for and the result of apostolic action. The course includes: reading, discussion, lecture, and practical exercises.

SC 4110 Black Spirituality

Black spirituality engages the mind, heart and spirit in a dynamic union with the transcendent and immanent God, as experienced in the heart of community. It is rooted in the history and experience of African peoples in the United States as well as in the Caribbean, and Latin America. Using various resources and methods (prayers, slave narratives, autobiographies, and more) this course will engage students in a critical examination of the roots, development and characteristics of the spirituality of African peoples (primarily in the United States).

S 4120: Latin@ Liberation Spiritualities

“Liberation Spiritualities emerging from U.S. Latin@ contexts are a more recent and evolving synthesis within Christian Spirituality. This course proposes an exploration of the Christian spiritual tradition in the light of the Latin@ experience. The first part of the course considers themes and issues involved in the creation and description of a Latin@ Spirituality of Liberation. The second part of the course examines how Latin@ theologians have expressed this liberating spirituality for Christian life through their proposals for Christology, worship, evangelization, and social justice.”

SMPC 4132/ 5132 Black Spirituality as a Source for Ministry

Black spirituality engages the mind, heart and spirit in a dynamic union with the transcendent and immanent God, as experienced in the heart of community.  It is rooted in the history and experience of African American peoples in the United States.  Using various resources and methods (Prayers, preaching, song, spiritual autobiographies, biographies, slave narratives, spiritual interviews and film), this course will engage students in a critical examination of the roots, development and characteristics of the spirituality of African Americans, as well as a participative experience of Black spirituality as found in the religious expression of the community and  ministries.

SC 4190 Guadalupe and Marian Spirituality

This Course considers how our Lady of Guadalupe fits into and breaks out of traditional Marian Spirituality within Christianity. Particular attention will be given to the themes of historical development, inculturation, evangelization and social justice. The course will be a conducted in a combination of lecture, group discussion and student led Marian celebrations.

S 4200 Spirituality of Religious Priesthood

This course considers the theology and spirituality of Catholic Priesthood within a Religious community. Students will study various Church documents on priestly formation/ministry and focus their study on the spirituality of priesthood as expressed in the documents of a particular Religious Community. The course is geared primarily for Religious who are seeking ordination but can be very helpful to lay ministers who collaborate with Religious Priests.

DSC 4200/DSC5200 Sources and Methods in Latin@ Theologies

The integral relationship between the lived daily experiences of Latino/a communities and the theological reflections that emerge from within these contexts is articulated as teología y pastoral en conjunto. This seminar explores sources and methods developed by Latin@ theologians and biblical scholars in their constructing of theological perspectives that recognize this intrinsic connection between theology and  ministry.

DS 4210/5210 Reconciliation and Forgiveness

An exploration of the theology and ministry of individual and social reconciliation in a variety of settings today: domestic violence, the Church, immigration and urban issues, and post-conflict settings. Issues treated include trauma, healing of memories, truth telling, justice, and forgiveness. May be taken at the Master’s or the Doctoral level.

SD 4310 Spiritual Classics of the Patristic Era

In this course students read and reflect on a selection of the most influential Christian spiritual classics from the Patristic Era (the first six centuries of the Christian era)., including Perpetua, Ignatius of Antioch, Origen, Gregory of Nyssa, Athanasius, Desert Fathers and Mothers, Benedict, Augustine, Pseudo-Dionysius, and others.  Students will have opportunities to practice methods of approaching these texts for spiritual benefit, academic study, and pastoral re-appropriation. Themes of history, development of doctrine, physical environment, culture, and gender are also highlighted.

S 4311 Spirituality of Lay Vocation and Ministry

This course addresses the concept of vocation and ministry as it impacts all who identify themselves as disciples of Jesus Christ, with special emphasis on the role of the laity in the Roman Catholic Church. Explore the history of the laity in the church and develop both a theology and spirituality of lay ministry based on contemporary scholarship and the lived experience of lay ministers in a variety of settings.

S 4312 Theology and Practice of Prayer

The course is an introduction to traditional and contemporary methods of Christian prayer and its stages of development. The process entails learning from some of the great teachers of prayer within the Christian tradition, as well as drawing insights from the contribution of other religious traditions. Provides the theological grounding necessary to evaluate and critique prayer practices, and interweaves theory and praxis.

SMP 4312  Spirituality of Family for Ministry

This course takes a look at spirituality and ministry through the lens of family. It will begin by tracing the traditional as well as newer practices of spirituality and how they engage children and family. Next the course will explore elements of spirituality that are inherent in the experience of families. Finally students will develop a spiritual theology of ministry to inform how they respond ministerially to the spiritual needs of families in parish and community contexts.

S 4313 Perspectives on Psychological and Spiritual Transformation and Maturity

This course looks at several of the major perspectives or models of human maturity. What are the psychological and spiritual ingredients that contribute to the development of mature adults? How do psychology and spirituality contribute to the development of mature Christians? A lecture-seminar format is used.

S 4314 Religious Life in Context

Explore the understanding of religious life in various historical and cultural contexts. Topics include 1) the various forms of religious life and the historical situations that gave rise to them, 2) the understanding of the vows and how these are expressed differently in different social-cultural contexts, and 3) religious life in the world and church today.

SH 4340  History and Spirituality of the Franciscan Movement

This course provides a survey of the historical development, theological contributions, and spirituality arising from the movement begun by Francis and Clare of Assisi in the thirteenth century and carried on by the generations that followed them. Special attention is given to the central themes of creation, evangelical poverty, the human person, Christology, and prayer, among others. We will examine the historical contributions to Christian spirituality made by members of all three orders of the Franciscan family as well as the manifold way the tradition continues in our own time.

BS 4520 Biblical Foundations of Spirituality

The faith of ancient Israel and of the early Christian communities is explored in order to establish the grounding for a contemporary biblical spirituality. Attention is given to biblical images for God, the various modes of prayer and worship, and the ethical demands for justice and peace in the biblical world and in our own.

S 5000 Earth Spirituality for Christians

Pope Francis’ Laudato Si’ has opened a new era of widespread awareness that the Christian vocation includes responsible participation in the whole community of Earth creatures. This course examines ancient and contemporary sources for Earth spirituality, with a special focus on spiritual practices that encourage and express true “conversion to the Earth.”

SH 5001 Christian History and Spirituality through Art and Architecture in Italy

A handful of significant cities have been the backdrop for many of the important events and people that have shaped our Christian faith. This interdisciplinary course studies significant moments, movements and figures pertaining to our history and spirituality. This two-week course takes place in the Italian cities of Rome, Assisi, and Florence. Students learn on site about the role of art and architecture in promoting the Christian faith. (Taught every two years)

WS 5001 Liturgical Foundations for Spirituality

Readings and seminar presentations on the structures, prayer forms, rhythms, and theology of liturgy to uncover liturgical foundations for Christian spirituality.  The seminar will conducted in a reading, presentation, and discussion style.

S 5004 French Spirituality and Its Worldwide Impact

The French spirituality of the 17th century has profoundly influenced the theory and practice of religious life, priesthood, and Catholic lay life down to the present day. This course studies major figures of that period as well as later developments, especially those impacting on the worldwide missions.

S 5005 Evangelizing the Baptized

Pope Paul VI reminds us that “The Church is an evangelizer, but she begins by being evangelized herself” (EN 15). This course considers the spirituality of “Evangelization in the Modern World” and other documents of evangelization. It also gives students a hands on approach to giving personal witness and preaching of the kerygma in retreats, days of recollection and parish missions. Students will be expected to preach in a public forum (usually a parish mission/day of recollection) as part of this course.

S 5006 Spirituality and Leadership

A blended course (online and onsite) that will focus on the relationship between leadership and spirituality from a primarily Christian perspective. The course will be attentive to the various ways spirituality shapes one’s understanding of leadership, the importance of context to one’s development as a leader and leadership styles, as well as the intersections between spirituality and leadership.

S 5008 History of Christian Spirituality Seminar

This seminar course will do an exploration of key movements and figures in the history and development of Christian spirituality over the course of 2000 years. Given the interdisciplinary nature of spirituality, this course will focus on the importance of history as a source for the study of Christian spirituality. MA and DMin students will be required to do a historical study of a particular spiritual figure and/or movement to be shared with their classmates.

S 5009 Biology of Spirit

This course will explore contemporary perspectives on such issues as: neuroscience and religious experience, differences and convergences between spiritual and scientific ways of knowing, human spiritual participation in ecospheres, theological and scientific views on the relations among body, mind, and spirit, etc.

CS 5010 Spirituality, Ministry, and Survivors of Human Rights Abuse

The prevalence of torture, human rights abuses and violence in our world challenges the missionary/minister to understand the personal and societal effects of trauma and to develop a spirituality of accompaniment with survivors in their healing and reconciliation. Not open to audit.

S 5010 God Images in the Writings of Theologians of Color

This course will place in conversation the images of God, in postcolonial, liberation and classical theorists with those presented in writers of color including members from Latin@, Black and Asian American communities. Attention will be given to how these God images influence the Christian spiritual life.

CS 5020 Spirituality, Discipleship, and Mission Today

This course explores discipleship in the New Testament, seeking its applications amid changing lives and in a changing world. First, we are called, then sent; the initiative and the agenda are not our own. Ponder the implications and applications.

SC 5020 Hispanic Spirituality: History and Religiosity

Provides a general introduction to the foundations, beliefs, and challenges of Hispanic/Latino spirituality. The course covers topics like: Mesoamerican and medieval Spanish religiosity; what Latinos believe about God, Mary, humanity, evil, etc.; and finally, the challenge of evangelizing popular religiosity and of enhancing Latino interest in the Word of God, justice, and liberation.

CS 5030 The Spirituality of Lakota-Christian Dialogue

In dialogue with Lakota Native Americans who practice traditional spirituality and/or Christian faith, this course examines a spirituality of justice and interfaith mission/ministry. Includes a week-long field trip on Rosebud and Pine Ridge Lakota Reservations in South Dakota.

SC 5040 Islamic Mysticism and Spirituality

An exploration of the Muslim traditions of piety, devotion, and spiritual purification known as “Sufism.” Topics include: early Muslim asceticism; love mysticism; sobriety and ecstasy; the stages and states of the spiritual journey; Sufi prayer and praxis; and classical Sufi poetry.

S 5101 Foundations and Methods for the Study of Spirituality

This seminar course is designed specifically for students who are concentrating in Christian Spirituality as a theological discipline at the M.A. or D.Min level. It will define spirituality as a field of study, explore the relationship between spiritual praxis and research in spirituality, survey research methods, evaluate the notion of a “spiritual classic,” and examine issues in the historical/theological study of spirituality. It will teach students the crucial work of appropriating spiritual classics for contemporary audiences.

S 5105 Discernment: Classical Traditions, Contemporary Dilemmas

Christian discernment is a way of life in which one seeks constant attunement to the presence and communication of God, a gift of the Holy Spirit, and an art that one learns by participation and practice.  It is also a theme upon which spiritual writers and theologians throughout the centuries have written extensively, with different foci depending on their culture and circumstances. This course is an exploration of historical Christian insights into discernment, in view of developing a discerning approach to contemporary dilemmas.

WS 5105 Church Year Prayed and Preached
This seminar explores the Church Year as a liturgical event, spiritual guide and preaching resource. Employing the methods of practical theology, it will consider the relevant contextual, historical, and experiential factors for celebrating, praying, and preaching the liturgical cycle of feasts and seasons. (3 credits)

S 5110 Spiritual Formation Seminar

Spiritual formation is a process of being conformed to the image of Christ for the sake of others under the guidance of the Holy Spirit, which is mediated through an ecclesial community.  Spiritual formation takes place in widely varying settings and contexts.  The process of spiritual formation can take place within religious communities, Christian initiation programs, at schools of ministry as well as places that are not explicitly considered spiritual formation programs, such as in the home, the parish, faith sharing groups, lay volunteer programs. This course will explore the unique character of Christian spiritual formation specifically addressing issues of culture, family, personal history and social location.

S 5112 Spirituality and Health

This course will provide students with an understanding of the relationship of spirituality, faith and health from a cultural perspective. Students will learn to appreciate and understand the relationship between one’s spirituality and faith and wellness/health. This course will focus on recent studies and scholarship on such themes as prayer and healing, power of story, addictions and 12 step programs, care of the person, environment and stress, illness, end of life and aging.

SC 5190 Santa María de Guadalupe y Tepeyac y Chicago**

This course reviews the history of Guadalupe and other American Marian events in light of their socio-implications on Christian spirituality. It will consider both Latin American, US American and Latina/o devotion to María as mother of God and sister in the lucha (struggle for justice).

DSC 5200 Sources and Methods in Latin@ Theologies

The integral relationship between the lived daily experiences of Latino/a communities and the theological reflections that emerge from within these contexts is articulated as teología y pastoral en conjunto. This seminar explores sources and methods developed by Latin@ theologians and biblical scholars in their constructing of theological perspectives that recognize this intrinsic connection between theology and ministry.

WS 5301 Patterns of Christian Prayer

This seminar examines the historical development of non-eucharistic liturgical prayer from early Christian prayer patterns through the reforms of Vatican II. This historical-comparative approach provides the context for inquiring to what extent there is an implied spirituality in the form, structure, and performance of such prayer; and how this might be beneficial to contemporary prayer practice.

WSC 5301 Prayer Patterns in the Abrahamic Traditions
This seminar course will examine the development of (non-eucharistic) liturgical prayer patterns in the Abrahamic traditions from ancient Temple and Synagogue prayer patterns into the 21st century.  This historical-contextual approach will provide a framework for inquiring to what extent there can be said to be implied spiritualities in the form, structure and performance of these prayer patterns, and how such might shed light on the evolving prayer practices of these traditions today.  Historical work will be complemented by shared theological reflection on the patterns we examine. (3 credits)

Word and Worship Studies

W3000 Liturgy: Principles and Practices

Introduces ritual, ecclesial, theological, and practical foundations of liturgy and liturgical celebrations in preparation for ministry in diverse pastoral and cultural contexts.

WMP 4000 Communication Skills for Ministry
This course will focus on increasing students’ understanding of issues related to intercultural communications, including worship in intercultural communities; employing old and new media in facilitating small group discussion and reflection in intercultural and interreligious contexts; practicing principles for dialogue in conflict situations related to worship and difficult parish situations; and developing skills for community outreach. Students will also explore other cultures through encounters with diverse arts opportunities in Chicago.

W 4010 Liturgies of Dying and Death
This course will examine Roman Catholic liturgical responses to dying and death set out in the Pastoral Care of the Sick (1982) and the Order of Christian Funerals (1989). We will explore the historical, cultural, and theological dimensions of the rites, attend to their pastoral celebration, and assess new situations for which ritual response is needed in today’s diverse pastoral contexts.  (1.5 credits)

W 4019 Canonical Issues in Parish Life
The Code of Canon Law specifies rights, sets forth duties, and provides for the vindication of rights.  This course will examine laws of the Church as they pertain to pastoral ministry.  It will focus on the nature of law in the Church, the notion of parish, Christian Initiation and the other sacraments, particularly marriage. (1.5 credits)

WS 4100 Liturgy, Contemplation, and Mission: Ecclesial Spirituality

This course integrates aspects of liturgy, prayer and contemplation which ground and shape an ecclesial spirituality for the evangelizing mission of the church, and it explores the Trinitarian basis for this integration.  Lecture, reading, discussion, and integrating exercises.  Previous coursework in liturgy and spirituality required.  (3 credits; auditors welcome)

W 4200 Initiation and Reconciliation
Theological, historical, and pastoral reflection on the experience and sacraments of initiation and reconciliation. Particular attention given to: the RCIA as norm for initiatory practice; the relation of sacramental reconciliation to the church’s life; and foundations of practical skills for celebration. (3 credits)

W 4201 Eucharist and Sacramental Theology
This course serves as a general introduction to sacramental theology, and a particular introduction to the Eucharist, its history, theology, structure, and practice. (3 credits)

W 4204 Canon Law
This course addresses the nature, role, and history of canon law; church structures and ministries; and law regulating sacramental practice. This course fulfills the MDiv requirement in Canon Law. (3 credits)

W4205 Lay Leadership of Prayer and Preaching

 Recommended taken later in one’s program. Prerequisite: W3xxx Liturgy; W4200 ORW4201; B3xxx Introduction to OT and B3xxx Introduction to NT

A practicum to develop competency in the leadership of the community’s prayer, including Liturgy of the Hours, catechumenal rites, the funeral Vigil, penitential liturgies, liturgies of Word and Communion, and ministry to the sick and dying. In conjunction with these settings, it will also consider the liturgical, canonical, and pastoral dynamics and practical skills of lay preaching. (3 credits)

W 4207 Presiding I

Prerequisites: W4200; W4201; W4206 and 4209.
A practicum designed for priesthood candidates to develop competency in leadership of sacramental rites, including initiation, weddings, wakes, and funerals. Special emphasis is given to Eucharist. (3 credits)

W 4209 Preaching I
This practicum explores the homily as a liturgical action within the Christian assembly. Participants consider the basics of homiletics and the liturgical, pastoral, contextual, and practical dynamics of preaching for Sundays, Feasts, and Liturgical Seasons. (3 credits)

W 4212 A Worshiping World: Liturgy, Culture, Context

Engaging the plurality of approaches of contextual theologies, this course explores the intersections of Christian liturgy with cultural, social, generational, and other situated worship experiences. Attending to a worldwide, ecumenical scope, the course examines a dialogue of past, present, and future for liturgical practices with a particular attention to contemporary worship trends, the ongoing dynamic of renewal, and the enrichment of the complex conversation of liturgy, culture, theology, and ethics. (3 credits)

W 4213 Presiding II

Prerequisites: W4200; W4201; W4206 and 4209.
A practicum designed for priesthood candidates to develop competency in the pastoral care and anointing of the sick and in the ministry of reconciliation. Open to students in their final year.  (2 credits)

W 4214 Preaching II

Prerequisite W4209
This practicum builds on the foundations and skills covered by W4209 Preaching I to consider preaching at daily Mass, at the celebration of the sacraments, at funerals, and in a variety of other contexts and settings. (1.5 credits)

W 4215  Predicación y Leccionario  Este curso toma en cuenta predicación para el año litúrgico incluyendo Cuaresma y Pascuacon las lecturas del leccionario. El método para la clase será en conjunto con la Hermana Barbara Reid, profesora en Biblia, y Padre Eddie De León, profesor en predicación. Incluso, cada estudiante tendrá la oportunidad de desarrollar su propia predicación en vivo y en video con texto. 

W 4216 Marriage and Anointing of the Sick.
Liturgical and theological exploration of the sacrament of marriage and the sacrament of anointing and the pastoral care of the sick and dying. Particular attention is given to the interplay of liturgy and pastoral care. (1.5 credits)

W 4217 Worship with Children

Christians who are children because of their chronological age (birth to approximately 12 years old) claim their role as children of God in worship in unique ways.  This course will explore theological foundations, catechetical principles, and pastoral strategies for engaging children in the worship of the entire assembly and for preparing and celebrating liturgies in contexts where the majority of the worshipers are children (such as Children’s Liturgy of the Word and Masses with Children in parish and school settings). (3 credits)

CW4301 Initiation and Contextualization

After studying the general characteristics of Christian initiation and other types of initiation as cultural-religious phenomena in a variety of historical contexts, this seminar focuses on theological, cultural, liturgical and pastoral issues in the holistic process of contextualizing initiation in particular Christian contexts.

W 5001 Catechesis and Religious Education in the Worshiping Community
This seminar explores the interplay of life, liturgy, and adult faith formation to promote a praxis of a holistic, transformative catechesis in the spirit of the General Directory for Catechesis. Offers an overview of the history of catechetical education; critical study of recent major catechetical documents; contemporary trends in adult faith formation; and the intersection of liturgy and catechesis. (3 credits)

WS 5001 Liturgical Foundations for Spirituality
Readings and seminar presentations on the structures, prayer forms, rhythms, and theology of liturgy to uncover liturgical foundations for Christian spirituality.  The seminar will be conducted in a reading, presentation, and discussion style.  (3 credits; auditors welcome)

W 5003 Theology of Word and Sacrament
Joining together theological interpretation and pastoral reflection, this seminar explores various topics in liturgical and sacramental theology in historical, contemporary, and emerging contexts. (3 credits)

W 5004 Liturgy and the New Evangelization
Building on contemporary discussions of the important connections between evangelization and liturgy, this seminar-style course will explore the evangelical and formative dimensions of liturgical celebrations and aid students in developing strategies for catechetical and spiritual practices that are rooted in the liturgy and which promote the work of evangelization in the world today.

W 5005 Liturgical Time:  Feasts, Seasons, and Saints 
The Christian sense of time is shaped by the celebrations Christians keep.  This course will explore the origins, development, and theological significance of the major feasts, fasts, and seasons of the Church’s liturgical year and consider the emergence and evolution of feasts honoring saints.   Topics will include consideration of Sunday as the preeminent Christian feast; the evolution of Easter and Christmas as the most prominent festal occasions in the yearly cycle and the growth of seasons and additional feasts around them (the Lenten and Easter seasons and the feasts of Pentecost and Ascension in the case of Easter and the Advent and Christmas seasons and feast of Epiphany for Christmas); and the rise of the cult of saints celebrating the continued unfolding of the paschal mystery in the lives of Christians through the ages.  The focus of the course will be on the history and theology of the celebrations of the liturgical year in various Christian traditions as myriad manifestations of the one mystery of Christ—with consideration  of pastoral issues and implications for lived spirituality. No prior knowledge of the subject is expected. (3 credits)

W 5021 Liturgy and Popular Religiosity
This seminar will explore the “non-official” contribution to Christian worship of the “plebs sancta Dei” (the holy, common people of God) who, though not theologians and church leaders, provide a cultural context for the liturgy. Through readings, seminar presentations, and discussions, participants in the seminar will examine both historic and contemporary influences of popular religion on Christian worship. (3 credits, open to auditors)

WS 5105 Church Year Prayed and Preached
This seminar explores the Church Year as a liturgical event, spiritual guide and preaching resource. Employing the methods of practical theology, it will consider the relevant contextual, historical, and experiential factors for celebrating, praying, and preaching the liturgical cycle of feasts and seasons. (3 credits)

W 5200 Liturgical Music
Employing the frameworks of practical theology, this interdisciplinary seminar will explore the practice of music in Christian worship. Through the lenses of context, traditions and the experience of prayers and musicians, the course will consider the kinds of theology and theological precedents such practices reflect and generate, and ponder how they contribute to shaping contemporary musical-liturgical practices that is musically, theologically, and contextually appropriate. (3 credits)

WC 5202 Liturgical Inculturation
This seminar explores the inculturation of the church’s worship in both historical and contemporary perspective with emphasis on current methodological and theological issues raised by the engagement of the church with contemporary cultures promoted by Vatican II. (3 credits)

WC 5205 Liturgy in a Multicultural Community
This seminar explores the complex situation of liturgical celebration in communities comprising people of diverse languages and cultural backgrounds. It takes up the dynamics of intercultural engagement; assumptions, principles, and critiques relating to multiculturalism; importance of popular religiosity; and contemporary models for liturgy that embrace the plurality of cultures in a respectful, inclusive way. (3 credits)

W 5210 Liturgical Catechesis
Drawing upon the nature of liturgical celebration and principles of adult education, this seminar explores the nature and role of liturgical catechesis and mystagogy, and examines several models for experientially based learning and formation for adult worshipers. (3 credits)

WS 5225 Worship, Spirituality, and Digital Media Arts
Media arts in Christian worship is not a new phenomenon. The first instance recorded occurred at the end of the 19th century. Since the mid-1990s, though, more and more faith communities have chosen to add projection or display of images and video into their worship. Why? How? To what end? How is this practice to be evaluated? By what criteria? These are among the many questions raised in this course that focuses on how the local creation of digital media arts can become a spiritual practice not only for the individual producer, but also for the larger faith community when it is done in a small group process that leads to contemplative media art-making and media art-sharing. Students will explore how today’s media arts (photography, video, new media arts) can appropriately be integrated into Roman Catholic and other Christian liturgy and how the creation of media arts might become a part of faith formation for adults as well as for children and teens. Each week students practice doing photography as a spiritual practice. Through this practice, they discover how the act of media art-making and media art-sharing in community can encourage participants to be become more and more contemplative in their everyday life and to become more attuned to glimpses of grace everywhere around them.  (3 credits)

W 5227 Shaping Places for Worship
Using a range of media and methods, this seminar examines liturgical, spatial, artistic, and human issues involved in shaping places for worship. (3 credits)

W 5230 Liturgical Methods
This seminar introduces students to the major methodological trends in the field of liturgy. Students engage both in the reading of the classic and contemporary works and in the exploration of the various methods by applying them to a study of liturgical rites and texts. (3 credits)

W 5240 Ritual Studies
This seminar explores the ritual dimensions of liturgical celebration. Student presentations are based on field observation and readings in ritual theory from various social sciences. (3 credits)

W 5241 Liturgical History
This course provides an overview of Christian liturgy from its Jewish matrix until the present, especially in the west. It introduces significant movements, places, events, liturgical sources, and individuals that provide basic historical, social, cultural, and theological frameworks for understanding the development of Christian worship. (3 credits)

WSC 5301 Prayer Patterns in the Abrahamic Traditions
This seminar course will examine the development of (non-eucharistic) liturgical prayer patterns in the Abrahamic traditions from ancient Temple and Synagogue prayer patterns into the 21st century.  This historical-contextual approach will provide a framework for inquiring to what extent there can be said to be implied spiritualities in the form, structure and performance of these prayer patterns, and how such might shed light on the evolving prayer practices of these traditions today.  Historical work will be complemented by shared theological reflection on the patterns we examine. (3 credits)

W 5525 Shaping Places for Worship
Christian communities often face the challenge of renovating or building new worship spaces. Many worship in temporary spaces and have to create an environment appropriate for their liturgies. In this online course, students explore how shaping places for worship, whether permanent or temporary, is an urgent issue that requires knowledge of the history of liturgical art and architecture, from ancient to contemporary; appreciation for how creating worship spaces that are universally accessible and designed with sustainability in mind is a matter of hospitality and justice; understanding of how the incorporation of various media arts can become a communal activity that eventually leads to the creation of liturgical media art; appreciation for the history of inculturation in church art and architecture; knowledge of how community processes are a critical part of any renovation or building project; and understanding of Roman Catholic, ELCA Lutheran, and other denominational guidelines regarding worship spaces. Students conclude this online seminar with a project focused on a topic pertinent to their ministry.  (3 credits)

Prerequisites

MA2210 Research and Writing Skills for Graduate Theological Education

This course is designed as a general introduction to graduate level research and writing, as well as issues of scholarly communication, though it will also be of value to those wishing to improve their current skill set. The major assignment will be a 12-15 page research paper, either on a theological topic of the student’s choice OR a version of a paper being written for another course. Smaller weekly assignments are designed to practice the skills taught in class and/or build towards the final paper. The course incorporates lecture, discussion, online and in-class exercises, along with listed readings and assignments, to teach a set of skills foundational to successful graduate work. Additional short readings will be assigned weekly on current topics of scholarly communication and intellectual property for discussion in class. Assignments and course readings may be adapted to suit student needs.